Is Your Pet Safe When Riding in the Car? Tips to Help Ensure the Answer Is Yes

BY KIM CAMPBELL THORNTON | Article Featured on Vetstreet.com

You put your dog or cat in a crate, car seat or harness when he rides in the car. Seems like the right thing to do, doesn’t it?

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What is Cat Scratch Disease? Sign & Symptoms of Bartonellosis

What is Cat Scratch Disease? Sign & Symptoms of Bartonellosis

Article Featured on Vetstreet.com
Most people have heard of “cat scratch fever” –– or at least they’ve heard the Ted Nugent song. But few know how the disease affects cats and, potentially, their people. The infection, officially called bartonellosis and caused by a bacteria carried by fleas, can bring on a host of symptoms in cats –– fever, sneezing, eye inflammation –– or none at all. And it can be transmitted to humans through a scratch or bite.
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What is Cat Scratch Disease? Sign & Symptoms of Bartonellosis

What is Cat Scratch Disease? Sign & Symptoms of Bartonellosis

Article Featured on Vetstreet.com

Most people have heard of “cat scratch fever” –– or at least they’ve heard the Ted Nugent song. But few know how the disease affects cats and, potentially, their people. The infection, officially called bartonellosis and caused by a bacteria carried by fleas, can bring on a host of symptoms in cats –– fever, sneezing, eye inflammation –– or none at all. And it can be transmitted to humans through a scratch or bite.

Read more

7 Dog Choking Hazards to Avoid

7 Dog Choking Hazards to Avoid

By AMY SINATRA AYRES | Article Featured on VetStreet

Tennis balls, sticks and steak bones may be some of your dog’s favorite things. But many well-intentioned owners don’t realize that these items — and other things they may typically give their dogs — can be dangerous.

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Original Article By PetMD
A UK-based study found that dogs may be become anxious or depressed when their owners use their smartphones excessively. Unsurprisingly, the study also found Read more


Original Article from Animal Planet
When a cat stops using the litter box, there’s always a reason. Your first impulse may be to shout at the cat, but that will just frighten and confuse him. Cats are not vengeful, and he is not going outside his box to get back at you for pushing him off the sofa. Instead, look at what may have triggered this change, which you yourself may have inadvertently caused.
Because cats are habitually clean, Frisky may be upset by a litter box that isn’t changed often enough to suit him, even if you think every other day is OK. Would you use a bathroom with an unflushed toilet? Changes in household routine may also be cause to forgo the box. If you’ve added a new cat, the resident feline may dislike using the same litter box as the newcomer. He may also not appreciate that you’ve replaced his regular litter with a new-fangled one. Cats are keenly aware of the scent and feel of their litter, so if you’ve changed brands or types to take advantage of a sale, your cat may not approve of the savings the way you do. A move to a new home or a student back from college for the summer can also upset him.
Using the carpet rather than the box may also be a sign of disease. Cats suffering from urinary tract infections may associate painful attempts at urination with the litter box, and avoid it. A cat who’s thirstier due to kidney, liver or thyroid conditions needs to urinate more frequently, and may not get to his box on time. Similarly, feline diarrhea or constipation may find him desperate to go without caring where.

Has your cat been “going” outside of the box as of late?

Observe the cat and notice if he is straining to go and/or crying out. He may claw out a space in a potted plant, choosing clean dirt over a soiled litter box. Or he may squat on your carpet or floor because he associates the sensation of digging in litter with uncomfortable elimination. If you confine him to a closed room with a clean litter box and he ignores it, he may have no control over his actions. This signals that illness, not behavior, is the culprit. The cat is in pain, and your vet needs to determine why.
A thorough checkup will reveal whether Kitty has a urinary tract infection, inflammatory bowel disease, diabetes, arthritis, kidney, liver or thyroid malfunction or other illnesses that may affect his litter box habits. If illness, minor or serious, is the cause, medication or treatment should relieve his pain and distress.
Whatever has pushed your cat out of the box, getting him back on track will take patience. If anxiety created the problem, set up a quiet retreat for the cat to do his business in a room or area with minimal household traffic. Provide a large-enough litter box — or two — with the kind of litter your cat prefers, and change it frequently, even several times a day if necessary. You may decide to confine him for a few days to establish a new, calmer routine.
Inflammatory bowel disease, constipation, diarrhea or urinary tract infections will abate with medication or treatment, so if one of these caused your cat’s problem, he should return to using his litter box as his discomfort eases. Longer-term conditions, such as arthritis or kidney problems, may mean making adjustments: Be sure the cat’s box is low enough for him to get into comfortably, and offer more than one box to accommodate more frequent usage. Always keep the litter boxes clean by washing and disinfecting them weekly and quickly removing soiled litter.


Oregon Veterinary Specialty Hospital (OVSH) has been serving the Portland and Beaverton area community since 1979. Drs. Steven F. Skinner (Neurology, Neurosurgery) and Robert T. Franklin (Internal medicine.) We welcome referrals from veterinarians all over the Pacific Northwest. Our goal is to help your pet regain health and live a long and happy life.

Oregon Veterinary Specialty Hospital

Address
9339 SW Beaverton Hillsdale Hwy,
Beaverton, OR 97005.
Phone: 503.292.3001
Fax: 503.292.6808
Email: info@ovshosp.com

Summer heat can be dangerous for your pets!

Story by: Trisha Gedon Original Link
Summer is in full swing, and with it comes many opportunities to enjoy the outdoors. Pet owners often like spending time outside with family, friends and pets.
A lot of animals like spending time outside, and therefore, pet owners need to take precautions to ensure their animals stay safe in the summer heat, said Dr. Laura Nafe, assistant professor of small animal internal medicine at the Oklahoma State University Center for Veterinary Health Sciences.
“Just as you hydrate yourself and take precautions such as applying sunscreen and staying cool in the heat, it’s vital to keep a close eye on your pet when spending time outdoors, especially on a hot, sunny day,” Nafe said.
Dogs do not sweat like humans. Instead, they cool themselves primarily by panting. Excessive panting indicates your pet is overheated. Dogs also will seek shade to help cool themselves in the heat of the summer, and they enjoy a nice, cool breeze just like the rest of us.
“If you’re out for a walk or playing in the yard and your dog stops to sit or lie down, he is telling you that he is unable to keep cool enough for the activity,” she said. “A dog’s gums can be a good indicator of being overheated. Gums often appear more red early on when an animal is overheated, and become more pale if the dog is excessively overheated. In addition, a dog’s gums may be dry or sticky if the animal is not staying adequately hydrated.”
If you are spending time at a pond or lake with your dog, do not assume your pet will drink water from that source. Always bring water and a bowl with you and try to keep the water cool if possible. Your dog is likely accustomed to and prefers city water.
Dogs often love to travel in the car with you. Unfortunately, one of the most life-threatening mistakes people can make is to leave a pet in a vehicle in hot weather.
“Never, ever leave your dog in the car, even with the windows open. Cars heat up very quickly. As an example, on an 80-degree day, a car can heat up to 110 degrees in approximately 15 minutes,” Nafe said. “We’re well beyond the 80 degree days at this point in the summer, so extra precaution is necessary.”
Because dogs pant to keep themselves cool, taking in the hot air inside a vehicle has little cooling effect, and the animal will quickly overheat. Your pet may overheat and develop signs of heatstroke even after a few minutes spent in a sweltering car. As much as you enjoy your pet’s company, and as much as the pet enjoys a ride in the car, it is better to leave your pet at home on hot days.
Pet owners who enjoy going for a walk or run with their dog must remember asphalt gets very hot during the summer—hot enough to burn the pads on a dog’s foot. Before taking your dog for a walk, check the ground for hotness with one of your hands or bare feet. If you cannot keep your hand or foot on the ground for more than three seconds, it is certainly too hot for an animal. During the hot summer months, consider going on short walks early in the morning or later in the evening when the temperature is more bearable.
“Dogs who are older, overweight, have a thick coat, or have a pushed-in nose, such as bulldogs and pugs, are at increased risk of overheating,” she said. “It’s always a good idea to bring water for both you and your pet.”
Keeping your dog hydrated is essential to good health and is especially important during the summer months. If your dog is inside during the day, make sure it has fresh, cool water that remains in a shaded spot throughout the day, since sun coming through a window can heat a bowl of water. Most dogs will not drink hot water no matter how thirsty they are.
If your dog stays outside during the day, make sure the water bowl is in a place where it cannot be tipped over. Water bowls can be tipped over by dogs trying to make a cool spot to lie down. If possible, give your dog fresh, clean water several times throughout the day.
“Freeze containers of water to put in your pet’s outdoor water bowl,” Nafe said. “This will help ensure your furry friend’s water stays cooler for a longer period of time.”
Also, make sure to provide your pup with a shady area to get out of the sun. A small kiddie pool is a great way to provide a fun cooling-off spot where your dog can play.
“Despite all your precautions, your dog may still show signs of heat stress or heat stroke. Signs of heat stroke include heavy panting that does not resolve as the pet rests, increasing distress, a tongue color that is dark red to almost purple, weakness or collapse, hyper-salivation, vomiting and labored breathing,” Nafe said. “If you suspect a dog or cat is suffering from heat stroke, move him to a cooler environment immediately and apply cool water to the abdomen, ears and foot pads.”
Do not pour ice water over the whole animal, submerge your pet in a tub of cold water, or cover it in a cold, wet blanket, as these all may result in cooling your animal too quickly and decreasing blood flow to important areas. Once stable, get him to a veterinarian as quickly as possible, even if he seems to be cooling down and his temperature seems normal. Heat can cause internal damage to organs that is not obvious from the outside.
Keeping your dog well-groomed is another way to reduce the risk of heat stress and help keep the animal more comfortable in the summer heat. A natural coat that has been groomed offers protection from sunburn and acts as cooling insulation. Shaving your dog’s coat will take away that protection.
“Remember, your pet can’t tell you in words when something is wrong. As responsible pet owners, it’s your job to protect and provide for your pet,” she said. “If you’re feeling uncomfortably warm, it’s a sure bet your dog is, too.”


Oregon Veterinary Specialty Hospital (OVSH) has been serving the Portland and Beaverton area community since 1979. Drs. Steven F. Skinner (Neurology, Neurosurgery) and Robert T. Franklin (Internal medicine.) We welcome referrals from veterinarians all over the Pacific Northwest. Our goal is to help your pet regain health and live a long and happy life.

Oregon Veterinary Specialty Hospital

Address
9339 SW Beaverton Hillsdale Hwy,
Beaverton, OR 97005.
Phone: 503.292.3001
Fax: 503.292.6808
Email: info@ovshosp.com

oregon veterinarians, portland, oregon

Crinkling Tin Foil and Other Sounds Can Cause Seizures in Cats

By Samantha Drake
Everyday sounds, like crinkling tin foil, a metal spoon hitting a ceramic bowl, rustling paper or plastic bags, or hammering a nail, can have a worrisome effect on your cat, according to a new study. Researchers say certain high-pitched sounds cause noise-induced seizures in older cats — and the response is not all that unusual.
Until now, the condition has not been well-documented, so many cat owners tend to dismiss the seizures as a sign of old age, notes Dr. Mark Lowrie of Davies Veterinary Specialists in Hertfordshire, England. Lowrie is the lead author of the study recently published in The Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery.
“We don’t know the prevalence of this condition currently but it is far more common than anyone first thought,” he says.

Older Cats Affected

The media has dubbed the seizures the “Tom and Jerry Syndrome” after Tom, the cartoon kitty who often jumps suddenly in response to the antics of Jerry, his cartoon mouse nemesis. Researchers call the disorder “feline audiogenic reflex seizures (FARS).”
FARS affects older cats, says Lowrie, with 15 being the average age of the cats in the study. Although any breed of cat could have FARS, about one-third of the cats in the study were Birmans, specifically those with blue and seal points, he adds.
The study of 96 cats, a population roughly half male and half female, also found that even relatively quiet sounds, like squeaky shoes or jangling keys, can cause a seizure. Lowrie explains that cats have an ultrasonic hearing range, including frequencies humans can’t detect. Many of the domestic sounds found to trigger seizures have a high amount of ultrasonic frequencies. “Therefore, they may sound innocuous to us, but to cats sensitive to these frequencies, they actually sound more startling,” he says.
Interestingly, about half the cats in the study were hearing-impaired or deaf, he points out.

Managing FARS

Obviously, many of the sounds that trigger FARS can’t be entirely eliminated from a domesticated cat’s environment. Although there’s currently no cure for FARS, the anti-seizure medication levetiracetam helps to effectively manage the condition in cats, says Lowrie.
The researchers began investigating FARS after the charitable organization International Cat Care brought the condition to their attention, Lowrie explains, adding, “This was a real concern.”


Oregon Veterinary Specialty Hospital (OVSH) has been serving the Portland and Beaverton area community since 1979. Drs. Steven F. Skinner (Neurology, Neurosurgery) and Robert T. Franklin (Internal medicine.) We welcome referrals from veterinarians all over the Pacific Northwest. Our goal is to help your pet regain health and live a long and happy life.

Oregon Veterinary Specialty Hospital

Address
9339 SW Beaverton Hillsdale Hwy,
Beaverton, OR 97005.
Phone: 503.292.3001
Fax: 503.292.6808
Email: info@ovshosp.com

Some of us take the phrase, “dog days of summer” quite literally— we want to go everywhere accompanied by our beloved dogs! While this can be great, know that the heat of summer has the potential to be hazardous to your dog’s health. One of the greatest summer dangers is dehydration. Dogs get hot faster than people, and it’s easy for even the healthiest of dogs to become dehydrated.
Significant forethought and planning to accommodate higher temperatures separate a fun summer day from a trip to the emergency veterinarian. Read more

specialty veterinarians, beaverton, oregon

Article by Mellissa Beall, DVM, PhD | Found on PetHealthNetwork
Tick encounters are increasingly hard to avoid. These adaptable parasites are responsible for spreading a variety of diseasesthroughout the United States, and their range is increasing. Unfortunately, due to issues, such as mice and deer overpopulation (they serve as hosts for ticks), reforestation, suburban sprawl, and patterns in bird migration, among others, ticks and other bugs are taking root in new regions. Add climate change on top of our boundary-less society, and it’s clear that your dog—and your family—may be meeting more parasites. Read more