Heat Stroke in cats, Risk factors for heat stroke, how to treat heat stroke, animal speicialty hospital in Beaverton Oregon

From From CatsLoveCardboard and Preventative Vet

Cats tend to be smarter (or more concerned) than dogs about their own comfort, and they do a better job of seeking out cooler areas when they need to.

With that said, cats can still suffer from heat stroke. Unlike typical cases involving dogs, cats are more likely to get heat stroke in the following situations:

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Controlling Mosquitoes and Dangerous Disease Risk

Article Featured on Valley Vet

Enjoying time on the patio; hiking with your furry friend; riding your horse; finishing up barn chores. What do all of these have in common? None of them are nearly as pleasant when you’re being swarmed with mosquitoes.

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Animals and Coronavirus Disease 2019
Sylar Pet Shop

Article Featured on CDC.gov

Key Points
  • Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses. Some cause illness in people and others cause illness in certain types of animals.
  • Coronaviruses that infect animals can become able to infect people, but this is rare.
  • We do not know the exact source of the current outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).
  • We do not have evidence that companion animals, including pets, can spread COVID-19.
  • We do not have evidence to suggest that imported animals or animal products imported pose a risk for spreading the 2019 novel coronavirus in the United States.

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses. Some coronaviruses cause cold-like illnesses in people, while others cause illness in certain types of animals, such as cattle, camels, and bats. Some coronaviruses, such as canine and feline coronaviruses, only infect animals and do not infect humans.

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How to Spot the Signs of Fleas

The problem begins with some scratching here and there. Maybe you spot some tiny specks around the house that you might’ve missed before. Maybe that beautiful hair that was so thick is looking a tad thin these days. Before you know it … yep. It’s confirmed.

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Original Article By Vetstreet.com

Adopting a new kitten can seem like a daunting responsibility, especially if it’s your first. This guide will help you determine exactly which kitty will be a good match for your lifestyle. Read more


Original Article By Pet Health Network


If you’re considering bringing a feline companion into your home, and wondering where to look, an animal shelter is a great option. There are so many reasons to adopt from a shelter, but here are 10 of my favorites.
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Original Article  from Science Daily

Human encouragement might influence how dogs solve problems, according to a new Oregon State University study.

The study, published in the journal Applied Animal Behaviour Science, sheds light on how people influence animal behavior, said study lead author Lauren Brubaker, a doctoral student in OSU’s Human-Animal Interaction Lab.
Brubaker evaluated the behavior of search and rescue dogs and pet dogs when presented with the same problem-solving task. Both sets of dogs persisted at the task for about the same proportion of time, but the search and rescue dogs were more successful at solving the task when encouraged by their owners.
However, the search and rescue dogs didn’t solve the task when they were alone. Further, pet dogs that solved the task with their owner present — but not encouraging them — also solved it when they were alone, Brubaker said.
“We thought that was unusual,” Brubaker said. “Because search and rescue dogs are trained to work independently, we expected that they would out-perform pet dogs on this independent task and that wasn’t the case. This suggests that the behavior of the owner, including their expectation of their dog and how they engage with their dog on a day-to-day basis, may influence the dog during a problem-solving task.
“This leads us to believe that communication between search and rescue dogs and their owner could be more effective than communication between pet dogs and their owners,” she said.
In the study, the dogs were given a solvable task with a person present: open a puzzle box containing a sausage within two minutes. They compared a group of 28 search and rescue dogs and a group of 31 pet dogs.
Search and rescue dogs were used as a comparison to pet dogs because they are traditionally trained to work independently from their owner. The search and rescue dogs were provided by Mountain Wave Search and rescue in Portland, Douglas County Search and Rescue in Roseburg, and Benton County Search and Rescue in Corvallis.
Pet dogs were recruited at random from the community through online advertisement and by way of word of mouth. Data from pet dogs from a 2015 study conducted by Udell were also used in the analysis. The dogs in both groups were from a variety of breeds.
The dogs were given the puzzle box under two conditions: alone in the room, and with their owner in the room standing neutrally. During the neutral phase, owners were instructed to stand in the room with their arms by their side and to avoid communicating with the dog. In the encouragement condition, the owner was instructed to encourage the dog however they saw appropriate, typically by using verbal praise or gestures, but without touching the dog or the container and without making contact with the dog or the container.
Before each condition the owner was instructed to “bait” the container by picking the container up, placing the food inside the container while the dog watched, and showing it to the dog to allow the dog to see that the container had food in it. Then they placed it on the ground in a designated location. In the neutral-human condition, the owner took three steps back and stood neutrally for two minutes. During the alone condition the owner left the room after placing the object on the ground.
In the human-neutral condition, three of the pet dogs and two of search and rescue dogs solved the task. Two pet dogs solved the task in the alone condition. In the encouragement condition, nine of the search and rescue dogs solved the task, while only two pet dogs did.
“When the owner’s social cues direct the dog towards the independent problem-solving task, then we see something interesting,” said Monique Udell, an animal scientist who directs the Human-Animal Interaction Lab in the College of Agricultural Sciences. “While most dogs increase the amount of time they spend attending to the puzzle when encouraged, pet dogs often end up treating the puzzle like a toy. Instead of engaging in goal directed behavior, they act as if their owner was encouraging them to play.”
Udell continued, “It’s possible that when directed by their owners, search and rescue dogs instead see opening the box as their job. Their owners may be more effective at communicating about the task at hand. Or maybe there is something inherently different about dogs that are selected for search and rescue that makes them more apt to solve the problem. More research is needed to know for sure.”

Therapy Dogs Ease The Stress Of Transition For College Students

Original Article By Carla Baranauckas
On some campuses, therapy dogs are available full-time and even keep office hours.

At some colleges and universities, like Georgetown in Washington, D.C., dogs have been present on campus for years as mascots to sports teams. Increasingly, however, dogs are becoming part of campus life to help relieve stress.
As students returned to the University of South Carolina this year, they were greeted by Indy, a therapy puppy who will soon be a consistent presence on campus, the Raleigh News & Observer reported. Once Indy’s training is complete, she will participate in pet-a-puppy events and hold office hours at the university’s Student Health Services.
The University of Southern California has had a campus facility dog since 2016. The black golden doodle known as Professor Beauregard Tirebiter — but you can call him “Beau” — has office hours at the student health center. The university said it believes Beau was the first full-time facility dog on a college campus, according to news reports.
Research indicates that positive interactions with dogs can create a sense of calm and well-being in a person, Olga Solomon, an occupational therapy professor at USC, told the university news service in 2016. Even just petting a dog can increase serotonin, beta-endorphin and oxytocin ― chemicals and hormones that make people happy ― and decrease the stress hormone cortisol.

Oregon Veterinary Specialty Hospital (OVSH) has been serving the Portland and Beaverton area community since 1979. Drs. Steven F. Skinner (Neurology, Neurosurgery) and Robert T. Franklin (Internal medicine.) We welcome referrals from veterinarians all over the Pacific Northwest. Our goal is to help your pet regain health and live a long and happy life.

Oregon Veterinary Specialty Hospital

Address
9339 SW Beaverton Hillsdale Hwy,
Beaverton, OR 97005.
Phone: 503.292.3001
Fax: 503.292.6808
Email: info@ovshosp.com

lazycat

Fat cat? Here’s how much to feed to lose weight

Original Article by Lauren Quinn
University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences.

Does your cat lay around all day, only getting up to eat and visit the litter box? Chances are, he’s overweight. Maybe you’ve switched to the “diet” cat food or tried feeding him less, but you might have noticed it’s not easy to get that weight off. A new study from the University of Illinois explains what it takes to get kitty to slim down.

“The intent with this diet was a healthy weight loss: getting rid of fat while maintaining lean mass. The big question was how much does it take to make cats lose weight, especially lazy neutered males? It turns out you have to keep reducing their food intake because they’re not very active. It takes a long time,” says Kelly Swanson, Kraft Heinz Company Endowed Professor in Human Nutrition in the Department of Animal Sciences and the Division of Nutritional Sciences at U of I.
Swanson and his colleagues wanted to target a safe level of weight loss — enough to notice a change, but not enough to cause health problems. “The risk with rapid weight loss, especially in a cat, is hepatic lipidosis. The body releases too much fat, and the liver gets bogged down. They can’t handle that much,” Swanson says. “We targeted a 1.5 percent body weight loss per week, which falls in line with the range (0.5-2 percent per week) suggested by the American Animal Hospital Association.”
To achieve that 1.5 percent loss, the researchers had to cut food intake by 20 percent compared to a maintenance diet. But that was only the first reduction. Swanson and his colleagues found that to achieve continued weight loss, they had to keep cutting intake every week.
“That’s a key point. When we go on a diet ourselves, we might lose a lot of weight in the first few weeks and then hit a road block. Same with these animals. We had to keep going down, but it can be hard to convince a pet owner to do that. You might get owners to reduce intake from 60 to 50 grams per day, but we’re telling them they might have to go to 45 or 40 grams. We got really low, but we were monitoring them so they were healthy,” he says.
The goal was a healthy body condition score of 5 on a 9-point scale. An animal with a BCS of 1 is very emaciated, but one with a score of 9 is, as Swanson puts it, “like a little blimp.” An animal with an ideal BCS of 5 has a little layer of fat on the ribs, but has a tuck at the waist.
As hard as it may be to convince owners to reduce their cats’ food intake, it might be harder to convince them that their pets are overweight in the first place.
“We’ve done some clinical studies in dogs showing that misconception. If you have a veterinarian do a BCS assessment of a pet and then have an owner do it, the owner will almost always underestimate the BCS. Owners need to acknowledge the weight status of their pets.
“The second thing that needs to change is the owner’s behavior: getting them to reduce food intake to maintain a healthy BCS. Food companies recognize that many owners feed too much, so they’re trying to formulate their diets so it’s easier for the animals to maintain or lose weight even if an owner overfeeds,” Swanson says.
The researchers also evaluated changes in the cats’ fecal microbiota — or bacteria, fungi, and viruses that inhabit the gut — during the 18-week study. As the weight came off, some bacterial groups became more abundant, while others showed the opposite pattern. Swanson thinks the shifts may lead to positive health effects for the cats, such as lower inflammation, but he is waiting for additional results before making that call.
With the idea that they might have a little more pep in their step as they got leaner, the researchers also measured the cats’ voluntary physical activity during the experiment. The eight cats in the study, all neutered males, were housed together in a large room for 20 to 22 hours every day, only going back to their individual cages to be fed. Researchers attached activity monitors to the cats’ collars to see how often they were running, playing with toys, or climbing the cat towers around the room.
“Their activity level didn’t change much,” Swanson says. “Toward the end, they were becoming a little more active, but not statistically.” Still, he recommends owners encourage their cats to exercise as much as possible, by playing with them and placing food bowls farther away from favorite resting spots.

Oregon Veterinary Specialty Hospital (OVSH) has been serving the Portland and Beaverton area community since 1979. Drs. Steven F. Skinner (Neurology, Neurosurgery) and Robert T. Franklin (Internal medicine.) We welcome referrals from veterinarians all over the Pacific Northwest. Our goal is to help your pet regain health and live a long and happy life.

Oregon Veterinary Specialty Hospital

Address
9339 SW Beaverton Hillsdale Hwy,
Beaverton, OR 97005.
Phone: 503.292.3001
Fax: 503.292.6808
Email: info@ovshosp.com

specialty vet clinic, beaverton

My Cat Has Been Diagnosed with Cancer, What Now?

Article by Kim Freeman | Found on PreventiveVet

It’s heart-wrenching to hear that your beloved cat has cancer. You may feel angry, confused, depressed, or otherwise emotional. You may immediately feel a sense of loss and start reminiscing about all the good times you’ve spent with your cat.
It’s important to recognize these feelings and address them. You’ll need to take time to accept the cancer diagnosis. But it’s also important to remember your cat is not gone yet and they need you now more than ever.  They need you to be their advocate. Read more