My Pet Has Red and Irritated Eyes. What's Going On?

Article Featured on Vetstreet.com

This easy-to-spy problem is common in both cats and dogs and can be caused by an injury, an irritation or even a disease. Regardless of the cause, your pet’s eye may look roughly the same: Some or all of the structures surrounding the eye will be red and/or visibly swollen, a condition commonly known as conjunctivitis.

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What is Canine Distemper?

Article Featured on Vetstreet.com

Prevention is the key with this disease. Distemper in dogs is caused by a virus which is spread through most body fluids including saliva, urine, and blood. It is highly contagious and often deadly. At first, the disease mimics kennel cough, with goopy eyes, fever, runny nose, coughing, and tiredness the most common symptoms. Later signs of infection include seizures and paralysis. That’s why getting the vaccination against the virus is critical.

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What is Cat Scratch Disease? Sign & Symptoms of Bartonellosis

What is Cat Scratch Disease? Sign & Symptoms of Bartonellosis

Article Featured on Vetstreet.com

Most people have heard of “cat scratch fever” –– or at least they’ve heard the Ted Nugent song. But few know how the disease affects cats and, potentially, their people. The infection, officially called bartonellosis and caused by a bacteria carried by fleas, can bring on a host of symptoms in cats –– fever, sneezing, eye inflammation –– or none at all. And it can be transmitted to humans through a scratch or bite.

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What is Cat Scratch Disease? Sign & Symptoms of Bartonellosis

What is Cat Scratch Disease? Sign & Symptoms of Bartonellosis

Article Featured on Vetstreet.com
Most people have heard of “cat scratch fever” –– or at least they’ve heard the Ted Nugent song. But few know how the disease affects cats and, potentially, their people. The infection, officially called bartonellosis and caused by a bacteria carried by fleas, can bring on a host of symptoms in cats –– fever, sneezing, eye inflammation –– or none at all. And it can be transmitted to humans through a scratch or bite.
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Dementia Symptoms Increasing in Older Dogs

Dementia Symptoms Increasing in Older Dogs

Written by Dr. Karen Shaw Becker | Article Featured on Mercola Pets

Not many years ago, people with aging dogs focused only on keeping their pets healthy from the neck down, forgetting that such issues as weight control, possible arthritis and major organ support only go so far if their dog’s brain health is overlooked. Including your dog’s brain health in the overall picture is even more important as they get older, especially since more and more reports are emerging that show a “startling” number of older dogs starting to show signs of dementia.

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Original Article By Petmd

Cancer is the #1 Disease-Related Killer of Pets

Many people do not realize that cancer is not just a human condition; it affects Read more

Reasons Cats Get Sick After a Meal

By MADELEINE BURRY Original Article
Hearing your cat throw up is nothing out of the ordinary for most cat owners. We usually just think that they ate a little too much or too quickly. Although this is often the case, sometimes there can be a more serious reason.
If you’re a cat owner, it’s very likely a familiar occurrence that shortly after feeding your cat, you hear the sounds of regurgitation, and realize your cat has vomited. Why is it so common for cats to throw up after eating, and should you be concerned? Here are five common reasons behind cat vomiting, from the not-so-serious to potentially serious problems that necessitate a visit to the vet.

1. EATING TOO QUICKLY

When you set out wet food, or refill your cat’s dish with dry food, they can get a little too excited to nosh, and eat too quickly. Food eaten too quickly doesn’t get digested well, causing your cat to vomit. Movement or exercise after eating can also spur vomiting. If your cat vomits as a result of speedy eating, try feeding her several small meals throughout the day, rather than one large bowl full of food.

2. HAIRBALLS

Although hairballs are caused by hairs ingested during your cat’s grooming, and not by mealtime food, presence of hairballs can also lead to vomiting after your cat eats.

3. FOOD INTOLERANCE OR FOOD ALLERGY

If your cat is eating something in their food that they they’re allergic to, or even if your cat simply has an intolerance to it, this can lead to vomiting.

4. NEW FOOD

Switching foods could introduce an ingredient that causes an allergic reaction, but it could also simply throw off your cat’s eating routine, leading to vomiting after a meal. To avoid this, always switch to a new food gradually.

5. IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME

In addition to vomiting, irritable bowel syndrome can lead to upset stomachs and diarrhea. If you notice these symptoms, a visit to the vet is recommended to come up with a treatment plan.

MORE SERIOUS CAUSES

More serious problems can also cause cats to vomit. For instance, your cat may have a stomach obstruction as a result of ingesting a non-food item, like a rubber band. Or your cat may have accidentally eaten something poisonous. It’s also possible that your cat has a metabolic disorder, like a kidney-related problem or hyperthyroidism.
So as a pet owner, what should you do if your cat vomits frequently? If the vomit seems clearly tied to your cat scarfing down food at mealtime, you should try feeding your cat several small meals, as opposed to one or two large ones, and providing food at the same time each day. If your cat is a serious groomer then a specially formulated “hairball food” or supplement can help.
If vomiting persists on a weekly basis or more frequently, then there might be a more serious cause and a visit to the vet is recommended.


Oregon Veterinary Specialty Hospital (OVSH) has been serving the Portland and Beaverton area community since 1979. Beaverton Veterinary Specialist Dr. Robert T. Franklin (Internal medicine) welcomes referrals from veterinarians all over the Pacific Northwest. Our goal is to help your pet regain health and live a long and happy life.

Oregon Veterinary Specialty Hospital

Address
9339 SW Beaverton Hillsdale Hwy,
Beaverton, OR 97005.
Phone: 503.292.3001
Fax: 503.292.6808
Email: info@ovshosp.com

specialty veterinarian clinic, beaverton, oregon

5 Signs Your Pet Is Having an Allergic Reaction

Article by Mindy Cohan, VMD | Found on PetMD
Allergic reactions are something we have in common with our pets. Anaphylaxis, a severe and potentially life-threatening reaction often seen in people following exposure to things such as shell fish, nuts and insect stings, can also affect dogs and cats.
Both people and pets are susceptible to numerous allergens such as insect bites or stings, drugs (like medications and vaccines), foods and environmental substances (like mold, pollen, grass and house dust mites). Allergic reactions have both a multitude of causes and manifestations. It is important for pet owners to be familiar with the various symptoms of allergic reactions so that medical attention can be administered in a timely manner.
Here are five signs your pet is having an allergic reaction and how to treat them:

Itchiness

Itchiness is one of the most universal manifestations of allergies in pets. Itchiness can be either localized or generalized. Some of the common areas that are affected include the limbs, face, ears, armpits and hindquarters. Pets with allergies are often observed biting, licking or scratching at these sites, resulting in inflamed skin and hair loss. Dogs and cats suffering from severe allergies might traumatize their skin, resulting in open sores and infection. Seeking veterinary attention at the onset of itchiness is important to keep pets comfortable and prevent skin infections.

Facial Swelling

Seeing a pet with a swollen face causes both alarm and distress for owners. Puffiness can occur on the muzzle, ears and around the eyes. A change in a pet’s appearance is more dramatic and noticeable in pets with short hair coats. Areas that become swollen as a result of an allergic reaction are also often itchy, so a pet scratching or rubbing its face will also alert owners of a problem. Medical treatment fortunately provides rapid relief for pets suffering from this uncomfortable symptom.

Hives (Urticaria)

As with facial swelling, the onset of hives is more readily recognized in pets with short fur. Owners of pets with thick or long coats may not visibly notice hives, but will need to rely on their sense of touch in order to detect this symptom. Hives manifest as raised bumps throughout the skin. They may or may not be accompanied by itchiness. While they are not life-threatening, hives require urgent medical treatment for your pet’s comfort.

Gastrointestinal Problems

While most commonly associated with allergy-inducing foods, vomiting and diarrhea can result from any allergen. Protein-based foods such as beef and dairy products are more likely to cause allergies in pets than grains, and pets who become allergic to a particular food ingredient may have itchiness, vomiting and/or diarrhea.
The diagnosis of food allergies is difficult and requires a prescription diet consisting of a novel protein source (like venison, rabbit or duck) or hydrolyzed protein, which is less likely to cause inflammation within the gastrointestinaltract. Pets with non-seasonal itchiness along with vomiting or diarrhea should be evaluated for food allergies. Some pets with food allergies merely become itchy in the absence of gastrointestinal symptoms. Your pet’s veterinarian can discuss protocols and tests for discerning food allergies from inhalant allergies.
Vomiting and diarrhea can also result from an anaphylactic reaction. During anaphylaxis, the immune system is activated to release many chemicals. These agents have a systemic effect on many areas of the body, including the stomach and intestinal tract.

Anaphylaxis/Shock

Anaphylaxis is the most severe and serious type of allergic reaction. It can cause the body to go into shock resulting in decreased blood pressure, difficulty breathing, collapse and loss of control of the urinary bladder and bowels.
Any allergen can cause anaphylaxis in pets. One of the more common causes of anaphylaxis in dogs and cats are vaccines. Pets that receive vaccines should be monitored closely and not left unattended immediately after the injection has been administered. Following vaccination, monitor your pet for lethargy, weakness, pale gums, labored breathing and vomiting. If anaphylaxis occurs, symptoms are seen within a few minutes. If not treated promptly, anaphylaxis can be fatal.
It is important for pets to have any anaphylactic reaction documented in their medical record. In the future, vaccinations should be given with precautions such as the administration of reaction mitigating medications ahead of time and close supervision afterwards.

Treatment of Allergic Reactions

The management of allergic reactions is dependent upon the severity of symptoms. If your pet is stung by an insect, carefully remove the stinger if possible and apply ice or a cool compress to the area. Some pets may only experience pain at the site of the bite. Always monitor your pet for the development of hives, facial swelling or signs of shock and seek immediate veterinary care if problems arise.
Medications such as antihistamines and steroids are commonly used to treat allergy symptoms. Although common, over-the-counter antihistamines (e.g. Benadryl) are used in both people and pets, never administer medications to your dog or cat without consulting a veterinarian.
Pets suffering from anaphylactic reactions require immediate care. Treatments may include injectable steroids, epinephrine, intravenous fluids and antihistamines. Intubation to maintain an open airway and oxygen therapy are often necessary for pets experiencing difficulty breathing. Hospitalization and close monitoring are very important following a severe allergic reaction.
Avoidance of known allergens is the safest way to keep pets happy and healthy. Unfortunately, prevention is not always possible. If you suspect your pet is having an allergic reaction, seek veterinary care as soon as possible.


Oregon Veterinary Specialty Hospital (OVSH) has been serving the Portland and Beaverton area community since 1979. Drs. Steven F. Skinner (Neurology, Neurosurgery) and Robert T. Franklin (Internal medicine.) We welcome referrals from veterinarians all over the Pacific Northwest. Our goal is to help your pet regain health and live a long and happy life.

Oregon Veterinary Specialty Hospital

Address
9339 SW Beaverton Hillsdale Hwy,
Beaverton, OR 97005.
Phone: 503.292.3001
Fax: 503.292.6808
Email: info@ovshosp.com

specialty vet clinic, beaverton animals

Can Pets Get Vertigo?

By Helen Anne Travis | Found on PetMD
Like humans, pets can experience vertigo. The sensation of dizziness and imbalance is often caused by vestibular disease. The vestibular system governs an animal’s sense of balance and includes components in the inner ear and brain.
There are two types of vestibular disease, says Los Angeles veterinarian Dr. Patrick Mahaney. Central vestibular disease refers to a problem occurring inside the skull, like a tumor or stroke, while peripheral vestibular disease is caused by something happening elsewhere in the body, like inflammation in the inner ear. Peripheral vestibular disease is more common and usually has a better outcome for the dog. Read more

specialty vet clinic, portland

Nasal Discharge and Sneezing in Cats

Article by Ellie Mardell | Found on The Veterinary Expert
Cats with nasal discharge, “snuffly” breathing, snoring noises when asleep or awake, sneezing and sometimes gagging, are suffering from disease affecting the nose and/or throat. Signs that have been ongoing for more than 3 weeks are termed ‘chronic’, but many cats have problems for weeks to months, often with a variable response to treatment, before full investigations are carried out. Read more