Owning a dog tied to lowering your risk of dying early by 24%, says science

By Sandee LaMotte, CNN

Need an excellent reason to add a dog to your life? How about living longer?

“Our analysis found having a dog is actually protective against dying of any cause,” said Mount Sinai endocrinologist Dr. Caroline Kramer, lead author of a new systematic review of nearly 70 years of global research published Tuesday in “Circulation,” a journal of the American Heart Association.

The review of the health benefits of man’s best friend analyzed research involving nearly 4 million people in the United States, Canada, Scandinavia, New Zealand, Australia and the United Kingdom.

“Dog ownership was associated with a 24% reduction in all cause mortality,” said Kramer, an assistant professor in the division of endocrinology and metabolism at the University of Toronto. The meta-analysis found an even bigger benefit for people who had already had a heart attack or stroke.
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New research unpicks root causes of separation anxiety in dogs

Article Featured on Science Daily

Separation anxiety in dogs should be seen as a symptom of underlying frustrations rather than a diagnosis, and understanding these root causes could be key to effective treatment, new research by animal behavior specialists suggests.

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Do's and Don'ts to Help Kids and Pets Bond

BY MIKKEL BECKER | Article Featured on Vetstreet.com

Spending time with a pet can be a valuable experience for a child. My 7-year-old daughter, Reagan, has been around dogs her entire life. From the moment she came home from the hospital, our two Pugs, Willie and Bruce, were there to greet her, and they have shared all of her firsts: first tooth, first steps, first word, first day of school. Reagan has always seen the dogs as her brothers and her best friends — in fact, she barked before she talked!

There are a number of ways in which a dog or cat can be good for a child. Pets give kids a way to practice their social skills at the same time that they encourage much-needed physical activity. The strong bond between a child and an animal assists in development of important life skills and personality traits, including responsibility and empathy.

Kids and pets may be a natural match, but that doesn’t mean your toddler and your cat should be left to their own devices. To help ensure safe, happy interactions between pets and kids, follow these five do’s and don’ts.

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Growing Old Is Better With a Pet. Here's Why

By JAMIE DUCHARME  | Article Featured on Time.com

People who are looking to stay well as they age may want to adopt a pet, according to new data from the University of Michigan National Poll on Healthy Aging.

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Parvovirus: This Can Kill Your Dog in Less Than 72 Hours

By Dr. Becker | Article Featured on Mercola Pets

If you’re a dog owner, you probably know that canine parvovirus is a very serious disease seen primarily in unvaccinated puppies and immunocompromised dogs. It is highly contagious and can be fatal. A parvo infection causes hemorrhagic gastroenteritis, which is characterized by vomiting and bloody diarrhea.

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10 Pet-Proofing Steps for New Dog Parents

Article By Dr. Becker | Featured on Mercola Pets

Bringing a new pet into the family is an exciting time, but it can also be stressful. There’s so much to remember and do to make your new animal companion’s homecoming a joyful and positive experience, it can be easy to overlook something – even something potentially hazardous.

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What Do Cats Think About Us

What Do Cats Think About Us? You May Be Surprised

Unlike dogs, our feline friends treat us like other cats, author says.

BY 

| Article Featured on National Geographic
Since cats first got their adorable claws into us about 9,500 years ago, humans have had a love affair with felines.
Today more than 80 million cats reside in U.S. homes, with an estimated three cats for every dog on the planet.  Yet there’s still a lot we don’t know about our feline friends—including what they think of their owners.

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Vacaville Police Rescue 60 Shelter Animals Before Nelson Fire Strikes

Watch: Vacaville Police Rescue 60 Shelter Animals Before Nelson Fire Strikes

By Kendall Curley | Featured on PetMD

Image via SPCA of Solano County/Facebook
According to the Sacramento Bee, the Nelson Fire started around 5 p.m. on Friday, August 10, and “burned through 2,162 acres between Fairfield and Vacaville in Solano County,” in California.
Thankfully, as of Sunday morning, the Cal Fire website reported that it has been 100 percent contained.
However, while the fire was tearing through Vacaville, it started to edge closer and closer to the SPCA of Solano County, where around 60 animals reside.
The Vacaville Police Department explains, “As the Nelson Fire raced towards the south end of town, it looked like the Solano SPCA would be the first to be hit by the flames. Our officers worked with Humane Animal Services, SPCA staff and volunteers to evacuate all they could in a race against the clock.”

The above video is body camera footage from one of the police officers who helped to safely evacuate all 60 of the animals housed within the SPCA of Solano County building.
The Vacaville community then joined together to open their homes to these animals and provide temporary foster homes until the SPCA of Solano County can clean up and become fully operational again. Paws crossed that some of these foster homes turn into forever homes!

 
The SPCA of Solano County may have narrowly escaped the fire, but their building still suffered damage from smoke and lack of power. Luckily, the public has been more than willing to help by donating food and supplies.
In a Facebook post, they say, “Thank you for all the food that was donated. We now have plenty of food for the animals. What we are in need of now is bedding for the animals, towels, blankets, etc and cleaning supplies. Paper towels, large trash bags, bleach etc.”
They are also asking for financial support and donations to help them replace their supplies of refrigerated medications, vaccines and other medical supplies. For more information on how to help, check out their Facebook page.


Oregon Veterinary Specialty Hospital (OVSH) has been serving the Portland and Beaverton area community since 1979. Drs. Steven F. Skinner (Neurology, Neurosurgery) and Robert T. Franklin (Internal medicine.) We welcome referrals from veterinarians all over the Pacific Northwest. Our goal is to help your pet regain health and live a long and happy life.

Oregon Veterinary Specialty Hospital

Address
9339 SW Beaverton Hillsdale Hwy,
Beaverton, OR 97005.
Phone: 503.292.3001
Fax: 503.292.6808
Email: info@ovshosp.com

6 Essential Dog Camping Gear for Camping With Dogs

Source: Shutterstock


By Diana Bocco | Featured on PetMD
Planning to go camping with dogs? The first step is making sure your pup is up to date on vaccines for rabies, distemper, Lyme disease and leptospirosis, and discussing flea and tick prevention with your veterinarian. And the next step is getting the right gear in order to ensure that your pup not only has fun, but also stays completely safe during the trip.
Here are 6 dog camping gear essentials you want to make sure you bring along.
Pet Safety Tips when Camping With Dogs

Source: Shutterstock

Clean and Comfortable Bedding

An important piece of dog camping gear is a warm and comfortable place for you dog to sleep. A thick blanket, a second sleeping bag (folded a few times) or even a small foam mattress might be enough for your pup to sleep comfortably, as long as he’s young and ready to sleep basically anywhere. “If you want your dog to sleep on a blanket to add some cushioning, make sure you take it out in the morning, shake and clean it off well, and then store it until the evening,” recommends Dr. Robin Sturtz, DVM, program director at Long Island University’s Veterinary Technology Program in New York.
If you are camping with dogs that are older, or dogs that have joint problems, it is best to provide them with added comfort in the form of a travel pet bed, like the Carlson Pet Products portable travel bed. “Get a camping-grade dog bed if possible,” says Dr. Sturtz. “A cot is best; that is, something on a frame raised off the ground.”
Not only is a dog cot more comfortable, but it’s smoother and easier to clean than something you place on the ground. “A fluffy material looks comfortable but can quickly become a magnet for dirt and insects,” Dr. Sturtz says.

First-Aid Kit

Fortunately, many of the items in your own first-aid kit can also be used for dog first aid if necessary. “Bandaging materials (except Band-Aids, which won’t stick on fur), antibiotic ointment, and blood clotting gel/powder all work great for pets too,” says Dr. Kent Julius, DVM, owner of Legacy Veterinary Hospital in Frisco, Texas.
Dr. Sturtz also recommends bringing Betadine (which is better for cleansing small cuts and wounds than peroxide), an emergency blanket in case of sudden foul weather or severe injury, and sterile saline eyewash to flush away debris. “If there’s a stick or particle that you can’t flush out, get to the veterinarian immediately,” Dr. Sturtz says. “And bring tweezers with a magnifying glass to remove ticks, thorns, pieces of rock or glass; remember to grasp the head of the tick as close to the dog’s body as you can get, so that the entire tick is removed.” You can also pack a tick removal tool like TickEase, which is a special tweezer tool that comes with a magnifier.
To ensure you are completely covered while camping with dogs, you can even get a first aid kit made specifically for pets, like the Kurgo pet first aid kit.

Camping With Dogs Reflective Dog Leashes and Collars

Source: Shutterstock

Reflective Dog Leashes and Collars

Making sure your dog’s leash and collar have a light-up or reflective covering is also a great idea, so you can keep an eye on him at all times. “If the dog decides to go into the bushes to investigate something, the light will help you extract him safely,” Dr. Sturtz says. “At night, a light that shows the dog and the path can help you avert hazards on the trail.”
For nights out camping with dogs, a flashing light on the collar is even more effective, as it cannot be confused with a light coming from a flashlight or other campers. “Lighted leashes you can turn on and off that have both a steady-state and a blinking light feature are ideal,” says Dr. Sturtz.
The Nite Ize SpotLit LED collar light is a water-resistant neon light that can glow or flash. You can also try the Nite Ize NiteDawg LED leash that’s visible from over 1,000 feet away.
In a pinch, you can always improvise. “A headlamp attached securely to the collar would work well,” says Julius. “Even glow sticks attached to the collar ring work well as long as the pet cannot chew it or remove it.”

Camping With Dogs Bring Food And Water

Source: Shutterstock

Food and Water

It is important to remember to pack plenty of dog food and water when camping with dogs. “A water bowl is important, as some pets cannot drink enough from a water bottle,” Dr. Julius says. “And depending on the location, some outdoor water sources could be contaminated with parasites or dangerous bacteria.” To make storage of water for your dog easier, you can try dog travel bowls, like the Heininger WaterBoy, which allows you to store and serve water to your dog while on the go.
The same is true for making sure you bring your own dog food storage container with you instead of just buying dog food on the go or feeding your pup something he’s not used to. “This will help prevent the upset tummies from a change in diet,” Dr. Julius says. The Gamma2 travel-tainer can help store your dog’s food and feed him, so you can save precious car-packing space.


Oregon Veterinary Specialty Hospital (OVSH) has been serving the Portland and Beaverton area community since 1979. Drs. Steven F. Skinner (Neurology, Neurosurgery) and Robert T. Franklin (Internal medicine.) We welcome referrals from veterinarians all over the Pacific Northwest. Our goal is to help your pet regain health and live a long and happy life.

Oregon Veterinary Specialty Hospital

Address
9339 SW Beaverton Hillsdale Hwy,
Beaverton, OR 97005.
Phone: 503.292.3001
Fax: 503.292.6808
Email: info@ovshosp.com

How to Help a Puppy Who Isn’t Gaining Weight

How to Help a Puppy Who Isn’t Gaining Weight

By Paula Fitzsimmons | Article Featured on PetMD
You’re feeding your puppy a nutritionally-balanced diet and following the directions on the label with precision. You watch as your new best friend voraciously eats his dog food, and surmise his appetite isn’t the problem. Despite your best efforts, however, he’s not gaining weight as he should. Puppies grow at different rates, but if yours is below the average for his breed, there may be an issue. Anything from ineffective feeding methods to underlying diseases can cause slowed growth in puppies, says Dr. Dan Su, a clinical nutrition resident at the College of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville.
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