Why You Shouldn't Let Your Dog Eat Table Scraps

Article Featured on PetMD

It may be tempting to let your dog eat table scraps, especially when they are staring at you throughout your meal. You may even think you are giving them a nice little treat.

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Hazards to Avoid While Baking Homemade Dog Treats

By Paula Fitzsimmons | Article Featured on PetMD

Buying manufactured dog treats is a hit-or-miss proposition. “Most of them are loaded with salt, sugar, preservatives, flavorings and colors. Dog treats are made with a wide variation in quality and nutrient content regardless of labeling,” says Dr. Donna Raditic, a board-certified veterinary nutritionist with Nutrition and Integrative Medicine Consultants based in Athens, Georgia.

So how can you treat your pup without giving her something that will contribute to poor health and obesity? One option is to bake your own homemade dog treats. It’s not always easy, especially if you’re not sure where to start. However, if you follow a few basic guidelines, you can make nutritious and delicious homemade dog treats, even if you’re a beginner.

Be sure to talk to your veterinarian if your dog is on a special or prescription diet, says Dr. Susan Jeffrey, a veterinarian at Truesdell Animal Care Hospital in Madison, Wisconsin. “For example, if a dog is on a diet to prevent the formation of urinary stones or crystals, the ingredients of the treats may negate that diet. The same can be said for dogs with food allergies and sensitivities.”

Prevent Injury and Illness

Baking healthy homemade dog treats won’t mean much if your best friend is harmed in the process. To help keep them safe, here are some precautions you should take to prevent accidents and foodborne illnesses:

  • The kitchen can be a dangerous place for dogs; they don’t understand the concept of hot stoves and ovens. Keep your pup safe while you bake by securing the area with a dog gate.
  • Avoid using baking molds containing BPA, a contaminant linked to cancer and other health maladies.
  • Don’t use toxic ingredients, including xylitol, onions, garlic, chocolate and raisins, says Dr. Jeffrey, whose professional focus includes preventative care.  If you’re planning to make homemade peanut butter dog treats, read the label carefully. “There are several peanut butters on the market that contain xylitol,” she cautions.

When in doubt, consult the ASPCA’s Animal Poison Control Center for a database of ingredients known to be toxic to animals, or call 888-426-4435 if you think your pet may have ingested a poisonous substance.

  • Cook homemade dog treats to an adequate temperature to kill potential pathogens, such as Salmonella that may be present in eggs and other ingredients, recommends Dr. Jeffrey. “Also, if treats are made out of raw meat, they should be cooked well (about 165 degrees),” she says.

Skip Unhealthy and Unnecessary Ingredients

The ingredients we enjoy in our treats are not necessarily good or even all that satisfying for dogs. For example, there’s no need to use frostings or sugars, says Dr. Raditic, who is also a cofounder of the Companion Animal Nutrition & Wellness Institute (CANWI).

“Avoiding fat is also important, as some dogs can develop pancreatitis with high-fat treats and foods. This is a painful inflammation of the pancreas that can result in hospitalization for a pet,” says Dr. Jeffrey.

What ingredients can you include? Many vegetables and fruits are a safe bet. Some that Dr. Raditic recommends include broccoli, carrots, summer squash, zucchini, Brussels sprouts, pumpkin, cucumber, celery, spinach, kale, dandelion greens, apple (and unsweetened apple sauce), peaches, pears, strawberries, blueberries and bananas.

Count Calories

Feeding your pup too much of any treat can result in nutritional imbalances, “Especially if the dog eats less of the complete and balanced diet and substitutes the incomplete and unbalanced treat,” says Dr. Joe Bartges, a board-certified veterinary nutritionist and Professor of Medicine and Nutrition at the College of Veterinary Medicine, at the University of Georgia in Athens. Keeping your dog’s food intake the same while adding a lot of treats as extras isn’t the answer either since this increases the risk of weight gain.

Treats should not make up more than 10% of your dog’s daily caloric intake, with the remaining 90% originating from a complete and balanced diet, says Dr. Jeffrey. (Dr. Bartges says that treats should comprise less than 5% of daily food intake for dogs.)

The best way to keep track of calorie intake is to weigh the treat on a food gram scale, says Dr. Raditic. “If your dog eats 100 grams a day of a food that provides 35 calories per gram, they are getting 350 calories a day. So your treats may contain 4.0 calories per gram, and if it weighs 10 grams, you are adding 40 calories. So now the total calorie intake is 390 calories, and that can really impact weight management.”

Dr. Jeffrey admits that it can be tricky to accurately calculate the number of calories in homemade dog treats. “One way is to follow a recipe that already has the calorie calculation, versus making up a dog treat recipe on one’s own.” As long as the recipe comes from a reputable source, this can also help you avoid making treats that are actually worse for your dog than the ones you can buy off the shelf.


Oregon Veterinary Specialty Hospital (OVSH) has been serving the Portland and Beaverton area community since 1979. Dr. Robert T. Franklin (Internal medicine) welcomes referrals from veterinarians all over the Pacific Northwest. Our goal is to help your pet regain health and live a long and happy life.

Oregon Veterinary Specialty Hospital

Address
9339 SW Beaverton Hillsdale Hwy,
Beaverton, OR 97005.

Phone: 503.292.3001
Fax: 503.292.6808
Email: info@ovshosp.com

When to Worry if Your Pet Refuses to Eat

Written by Dr. Karen Shaw Becker | Article Featured on Mercola Pets

Generally speaking, healthy dogs and cats love mealtime. That’s why a change in appetite — especially a decreased interest in eating — is something pet parents and veterinarians must closely monitor.

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6 Dangerous and Surprising Items That Contain Xylitol

by John Gilpatrick | Article & Images Featured on PetMD

Dog owners know the dangers that foods like chocolate, garlic, onions, and grapes pose to their canine companions’ health; foods that are harmless to most people.

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FOOD MEASURING MATH: LEARN HOW MUCH TO FEED A DOG


By Jennifer Coates, DVM | Featured on PetMD
Feeding dogs seems so simple. You just offer an appropriate dry dog food or wet dog food and never anticipate a problem.
Except, it’s really not that simple.
As pet parents, we care about our dogs’ well-being and health. We monitor how they’re feeling; we take them to the veterinarian; we give them all the attention in the world. But if we’re not paying attention to their diet—not just what we’re feeding them, but how much we’re feeding them—we could be doing our dogs harm.
The question, “How much should I be feeding my dog?” needs to be answered, but the answer doesn’t come easily. How can you accurately determine your dog’s caloric requirements? How clear are the instructions on your dog’s food? Why is your dog gaining weight when you feed what’s recommended on the bag?
If you’re ready to learn a few easy tricks to ensure that your pup is getting the right amount of dog food, then you’re in the right place.
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How to Make Sure Your Homemade Dog Food Delivers the Right Nutrients

By Jennifer Coates, DVM | Article Featured on PetMD
Homemade dog food is an increasingly popular option for dedicated pet parents. However, you need to supply many different nutrients in just the right amounts if your dog’s homemade food is to meet all of his dietary needs. Read on to learn the benefits of making your pup’s meals as well as how to make your own dog food safely and properly.
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Reasons Cats Get Sick After a Meal

By MADELEINE BURRY Original Article
Hearing your cat throw up is nothing out of the ordinary for most cat owners. We usually just think that they ate a little too much or too quickly. Although this is often the case, sometimes there can be a more serious reason.
If you’re a cat owner, it’s very likely a familiar occurrence that shortly after feeding your cat, you hear the sounds of regurgitation, and realize your cat has vomited. Why is it so common for cats to throw up after eating, and should you be concerned? Here are five common reasons behind cat vomiting, from the not-so-serious to potentially serious problems that necessitate a visit to the vet.

1. EATING TOO QUICKLY

When you set out wet food, or refill your cat’s dish with dry food, they can get a little too excited to nosh, and eat too quickly. Food eaten too quickly doesn’t get digested well, causing your cat to vomit. Movement or exercise after eating can also spur vomiting. If your cat vomits as a result of speedy eating, try feeding her several small meals throughout the day, rather than one large bowl full of food.

2. HAIRBALLS

Although hairballs are caused by hairs ingested during your cat’s grooming, and not by mealtime food, presence of hairballs can also lead to vomiting after your cat eats.

3. FOOD INTOLERANCE OR FOOD ALLERGY

If your cat is eating something in their food that they they’re allergic to, or even if your cat simply has an intolerance to it, this can lead to vomiting.

4. NEW FOOD

Switching foods could introduce an ingredient that causes an allergic reaction, but it could also simply throw off your cat’s eating routine, leading to vomiting after a meal. To avoid this, always switch to a new food gradually.

5. IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME

In addition to vomiting, irritable bowel syndrome can lead to upset stomachs and diarrhea. If you notice these symptoms, a visit to the vet is recommended to come up with a treatment plan.

MORE SERIOUS CAUSES

More serious problems can also cause cats to vomit. For instance, your cat may have a stomach obstruction as a result of ingesting a non-food item, like a rubber band. Or your cat may have accidentally eaten something poisonous. It’s also possible that your cat has a metabolic disorder, like a kidney-related problem or hyperthyroidism.
So as a pet owner, what should you do if your cat vomits frequently? If the vomit seems clearly tied to your cat scarfing down food at mealtime, you should try feeding your cat several small meals, as opposed to one or two large ones, and providing food at the same time each day. If your cat is a serious groomer then a specially formulated “hairball food” or supplement can help.
If vomiting persists on a weekly basis or more frequently, then there might be a more serious cause and a visit to the vet is recommended.


Oregon Veterinary Specialty Hospital (OVSH) has been serving the Portland and Beaverton area community since 1979. Beaverton Veterinary Specialist Dr. Robert T. Franklin (Internal medicine) welcomes referrals from veterinarians all over the Pacific Northwest. Our goal is to help your pet regain health and live a long and happy life.

Oregon Veterinary Specialty Hospital

Address
9339 SW Beaverton Hillsdale Hwy,
Beaverton, OR 97005.
Phone: 503.292.3001
Fax: 503.292.6808
Email: info@ovshosp.com

Hazards to Avoid While Baking Homemade Dog Treats
Article By Paula Fitzsimmons | Featured on PetMD
Buying manufactured dog treats is a hit-or-miss proposition. “Most of them are loaded with salt, sugar, preservatives, flavorings and colors. Dog treats are made with a wide variation in quality and nutrient content regardless of labeling,” says Dr. Donna Raditic, a board-certified veterinary nutritionist with Nutrition and Integrative Medicine Consultants based in Athens, Georgia.
So how can you treat your pup without giving her something that will contribute to poor health and obesity? One option is to bake your own homemade dog treats. It’s not always easy, especially if you’re not sure where to start. However, if you follow a few basic guidelines, you can make nutritious and delicious homemade dog treats, even if you’re a beginner.
Be sure to talk to your veterinarian if your dog is on a special or prescription diet, says Dr. Susan Jeffrey, a veterinarian at Truesdell Animal Care Hospital in Madison, Wisconsin. “For example, if a dog is on a diet to prevent the formation of urinary stones or crystals, the ingredients of the treats may negate that diet. The same can be said for dogs with food allergies and sensitivities.”

Prevent Injury and Illness

Baking healthy homemade dog treats won’t mean much if your best friend is harmed in the process. To help keep them safe, here are some precautions you should take to prevent accidents and foodborne illnesses:

  • The kitchen can be a dangerous place for dogs; they don’t understand the concept of hot stoves and ovens. Keep your pup safe while you bake by securing the area with a dog gate.
  • Avoid using baking molds containing BPA, a contaminant linked to cancer and other health maladies.
  • Don’t use toxic ingredients, including xylitol, onions, garlic, chocolate and raisins, says Dr. Jeffrey, whose professional focus includes preventative care.  If you’re planning to make homemade peanut butter dog treats, read the label carefully. “There are several peanut butters on the market that contain xylitol,” she cautions.

When in doubt, consult the ASPCA’s Animal Poison Control Center for a database of ingredients known to be toxic to animals, or call 888-426-4435 if you think your pet may have ingested a poisonous substance.

  • Cook homemade dog treats to an adequate temperature to kill potential pathogens, such as Salmonella that may be present in eggs and other ingredients, recommends Dr. Jeffrey. “Also, if treats are made out of raw meat, they should be cooked well (about 165 degrees),” she says.

Skip Unhealthy and Unnecessary Ingredients

The ingredients we enjoy in our treats are not necessarily good or even all that satisfying for dogs. For example, there’s no need to use frostings or sugars, says Dr. Raditic, who is also a cofounder of the Companion Animal Nutrition & Wellness Institute (CANWI).
“Avoiding fat is also important, as some dogs can develop pancreatitis with high-fat treats and foods. This is a painful inflammation of the pancreas that can result in hospitalization for a pet,” says Dr. Jeffrey.
What ingredients can you include? Many vegetables and fruits are a safe bet. Some that Dr. Raditic recommends include broccoli, carrots, summer squash, zucchini, Brussels sprouts, pumpkin, cucumber, celery, spinach, kale, dandelion greens, apple (and unsweetened apple sauce), peaches, pears, strawberries, blueberries and bananas.

Count Calories

Feeding your pup too much of any treat can result in nutritional imbalances, “Especially if the dog eats less of the complete and balanced diet and substitutes the incomplete and unbalanced treat,” says Dr. Joe Bartges, a board-certified veterinary nutritionist and Professor of Medicine and Nutrition at the College of Veterinary Medicine, at the University of Georgia in Athens. Keeping your dog’s food intake the same while adding a lot of treats as extras isn’t the answer either since this increases the risk of weight gain.
Treats should not make up more than 10% of your dog’s daily caloric intake, with the remaining 90% originating from a complete and balanced diet, says Dr. Jeffrey. (Dr. Bartges says that treats should comprise less than 5% of daily food intake for dogs.)
The best way to keep track of calorie intake is to weigh the treat on a food gram scale, says Dr. Raditic. “If your dog eats 100 grams a day of a food that provides 35 calories per gram, they are getting 350 calories a day. So your treats may contain 4.0 calories per gram, and if it weighs 10 grams, you are adding 40 calories. So now the total calorie intake is 390 calories, and that can really impact weight management.”
Dr. Jeffrey admits that it can be tricky to accurately calculate the number of calories in homemade dog treats. “One way is to follow a recipe that already has the calorie calculation, versus making up a dog treat recipe on one’s own.” As long as the recipe comes from a reputable source, this can also help you avoid making treats that are actually worse for your dog than the ones you can buy off the shelf.


Oregon Veterinary Specialty Hospital (OVSH) has been serving the Portland and Beaverton area community since 1979. Drs. Steven F. Skinner (Neurology, Neurosurgery) and Robert T. Franklin (Internal medicine.) We welcome referrals from veterinarians all over the Pacific Northwest. Our goal is to help your pet regain health and live a long and happy life.

Oregon Veterinary Specialty Hospital

Address
9339 SW Beaverton Hillsdale Hwy,
Beaverton, OR 97005.
Phone: 503.292.3001
Fax: 503.292.6808
Email: info@ovshosp.com

How to Help a Puppy Who Isn’t Gaining Weight

How to Help a Puppy Who Isn’t Gaining Weight

By Paula Fitzsimmons | Article Featured on PetMD
You’re feeding your puppy a nutritionally-balanced diet and following the directions on the label with precision. You watch as your new best friend voraciously eats his dog food, and surmise his appetite isn’t the problem. Despite your best efforts, however, he’s not gaining weight as he should. Puppies grow at different rates, but if yours is below the average for his breed, there may be an issue. Anything from ineffective feeding methods to underlying diseases can cause slowed growth in puppies, says Dr. Dan Su, a clinical nutrition resident at the College of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville.
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specialty, vet hospital, beaverton

Skin Disease Due to Food Allergies in Dogs

Article Found on PetMD

Dermatologic Food Reactions in Dogs

Dermatologic food reactions are non-seasonal reactions which occur following ingestion of one or more allergy causing substances in an animal’s food. The physical reaction is frequently excessive itchiness, with resultant excessive scratching at the skin. Read more