Hydrocephalus in Cats and Dogs

Article Featured on Vetstreet

Hydrocephalus, which literally means “water on the brain,” is a buildup of fluid inside the skull. This accumulation puts pressure on the brain, causing signs such as an enlarged, dome-shaped head, seizures, blindness, and behavioral changes. The condition is often congenital, meaning that is present before or at birth, and can occur in both dogs and cats. Small dogs are particularly susceptible. In mild cases, drugs can help treat signs, but severe cases often end in euthanasia, as surgery is costly.

Read more

What is Canine Distemper?

Article Featured on Vetstreet.com

Prevention is the key with this disease. Distemper in dogs is caused by a virus which is spread through most body fluids including saliva, urine, and blood. It is highly contagious and often deadly. At first, the disease mimics kennel cough, with goopy eyes, fever, runny nose, coughing, and tiredness the most common symptoms. Later signs of infection include seizures and paralysis. That’s why getting the vaccination against the virus is critical.

Read more

Dementia Symptoms Increasing in Older Dogs

Dementia Symptoms Increasing in Older Dogs

Written by Dr. Karen Shaw Becker | Article Featured on Mercola Pets

Not many years ago, people with aging dogs focused only on keeping their pets healthy from the neck down, forgetting that such issues as weight control, possible arthritis and major organ support only go so far if their dog’s brain health is overlooked. Including your dog’s brain health in the overall picture is even more important as they get older, especially since more and more reports are emerging that show a “startling” number of older dogs starting to show signs of dementia.

Read more

specialty vet clinic, beaverton animals

Can Pets Get Vertigo?

By Helen Anne Travis | Found on PetMD
Like humans, pets can experience vertigo. The sensation of dizziness and imbalance is often caused by vestibular disease. The vestibular system governs an animal’s sense of balance and includes components in the inner ear and brain.
There are two types of vestibular disease, says Los Angeles veterinarian Dr. Patrick Mahaney. Central vestibular disease refers to a problem occurring inside the skull, like a tumor or stroke, while peripheral vestibular disease is caused by something happening elsewhere in the body, like inflammation in the inner ear. Peripheral vestibular disease is more common and usually has a better outcome for the dog. Read more

pet neurology, beaverton

5 Signs of Dog Dementia

Article by Katherine Tolford | Found on Pet MD
While your beloved senior dog can’t really forget where he put his car keys, it turns out that he is capable of experiencing “senior moments.” If your dog forgets the route on your daily walk or if he’s not enjoying the things he once did, like chasing after his favorite toy or greeting you at the door, he could be suffering from canine cognitive dysfunction (CCD), or the doggy version of Alzheimer’s.
Canine cognitive dysfunction can occur for a number of reasons, like an accumulation of abnormal proteins in the brain. This creates a build-up of plaque, which eventually damages nerves and results in the loss of brain function, which can affect your dog’s memory, motor functions and learned behaviors. Read more

specialty, vet care, beaverton

Canine Epilepsy: Seizures in Dogs

Article Found on DogHealth.com
Epilepsy is a brain disorder that causes recurrent seizures. It is relatively common in dogs. Signs of epilepsy generally show up between the ages of 6 months and 5 years, with the most typical age of onset being 2-3 years. Epilepsy in dogs is not curable, but it can usually be managed with medications so that seizures are kept to a minimum and quality of life is good. Read more

Warning Signs of Neurological Disorders in Canines

Warning Signs of Neurological Disorders in Canines

Article Featured on PetHelpful
Like every pet owner, I confess I am sometimes guilty of not reading signs of ill health well enough. I lost my Jack Russell to cancer and had a heart-stopping experience with my dog Misty that made me realize how important it is to know what’s going on with my dog’s health to prevent the heartache of losing yet another pet.
In this case, I’m speaking specifically of neurological disorders, the signs of which are often ignored as finicky or frivolous. This is often the case with neurological disorders in humans as well.
I want to share my experience from what happened with Misty so others can read the signs before it is too late. This article is to help you recognize symptoms of what might be neurological problems in your dog so you can take it to the vet and have it diagnosed.
Read more

Recognizing Dog Dementia

5 Signs of Dog Dementia

Article by by Katherine Tolford | Featured on PetMD
While your beloved senior dog can’t really forget where he put his car keys, it turns out that he is capable of experiencing “senior moments.” If your dog forgets the route on your daily walk or if he’s not enjoying the things he once did, like chasing after his favorite toy or greeting you at the door, he could be suffering from canine cognitive dysfunction (CCD), or the doggy version of Alzheimer’s.
Canine cognitive dysfunction can occur for a number of reasons, like an accumulation of abnormal proteins in the brain. This creates a build-up of plaque, which eventually damages nerves and results in the loss of brain function, which can affect your dog’s memory, motor functions and learned behaviors.
Most dogs, regardless of breed, experience some form of CCD as they age. In a study conducted by the Behavior Clinic at the University of California at Davis, researchers found that 28 percent of dogs aged 11-12 years, and 68 percent of dogs aged 15-16 years, showed one or more signs of cognitive impairment.
Read more

Would You Know if Your Dog Had a Stroke
Article Featured on AAHA.org

Would you know if your dog had a stroke?

Strokes in dogs are less common than they are in people, but when one strikes the condition is equally as serious as a human stroke. There are three major forms of canine strokes, and it is important for pet owners to be aware of their causes and warning signs so they will know what to do if their dog has a stroke.
The two most common forms of canine strokes occur when an artery in the brain becomes blocked and cuts off oxygen to the area or when blood vessels in the brain rupture and hemorrhage. Both of these are serious conditions that need immediate treatment. These strokes are called cerebrovascular accidents (CVA) or transient ischemic attacks (TIA).
The third type of stroke seen in dogs is called a fibrocartilaginous embolism (FCE). It happens after a small piece of disc material inside the back breaks off and drifts into the spinal cord. This type of stroke happens very quickly when a dog is playing, jumping, or running.
Read more

Causes of Dog Aggression

Medical Causes of Canine Aggression

Article Featured on PetPlace
Aggression in dogs is defined as a threat of harmful behavior directed at another animal or person. It may involve snarling, growling, snapping, nipping, biting, or lunging. A dog may act aggressively for either behavioral or medical reasons, or a combination of both. Here are some of the medical conditions that may contribute to or cause canine aggression.
Read more