What are the Most Common Cat Skin Issues

Written by Dr. Melinda J. Mayfield-Davis, DVM, WCHP-AH | Featured on Vetericyn.com

Cats scratch and clean themselves all the time. You, as a normally distracted human being, probably don’t pay any more attention to their occasional itches than to their hairballs. But if you notice your animal companion is frequently scratching or continually grooming (in a neurotic, you’re-doing-this-too-much kind of way), it may be a sign that there’s a skin problem.

Just like people, cats can have sensitive skin. As you already know, your feline pal is adept at hiding his or her pain, so it’s important to know the signs of common cat skin issues. This guide is designed to help you recognize common cat skin issues and understand the possible causes. Read more

Chronic Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Dogs

By David Walker | Article Featured on Veterinary Experts

Chronic inflammatory enteropathy (or CIE) is a disease that causes inflammation of the bowel. It has some similarities to a human disease called Crohn’s disease. The inflammation can affect any or all of the stomach, small bowel and large bowel (colon).

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Management of Atopic Dermatitis in Dogs and Cats

Article by Anita Patel | Article Featured on Veterinary Experts

Can I cure atopic dermatitis?

In one word “No”, but you can manage the condition successfully. Atopic dermatitis in dogs and cats can be compared to asthma in people. Asthma can’t be cured but it can be managed; and just like asthma the management of atopic dermatitis is life-long. It is therefore important to put in place measures that are going to have the least side-effects for your pet in the long term that will provide him/her a good quality of life and that are the most cost effective and affordable for you.

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Streptococcal Pneumonia in Dogs

By Simon Priestnall | Article Featured on Veterinary Experts

The Canine Infectious Respiratory Disease (CIRD) Group at the Royal Veterinary College (RVC) are currently researching a bacterial disease that has been increasingly implicated in fatal cases of infectious pneumonia in dogs over the past five years. They are calling for dog owners and vets to recognise the signs of the potentially fatal disease Streptococcal pneumonia to ensure rapid treatment and contribute to research to reduce further spread.

The bacterial infection Streptococcus zooepidemicus causes a severe, bloody pneumonia in dogs, producing signs similar to those associated with toxic-shock syndrome in humans.

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My Pet Has Red and Irritated Eyes. What's Going On?

Article Featured on Vetstreet.com

This easy-to-spy problem is common in both cats and dogs and can be caused by an injury, an irritation or even a disease. Regardless of the cause, your pet’s eye may look roughly the same: Some or all of the structures surrounding the eye will be red and/or visibly swollen, a condition commonly known as conjunctivitis.

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Article Featured on Vetstreet.com

Abscesses and Bite Wounds in Cats and Dogs

Pets have a way of getting into trouble with one another. And when the seemingly inevitable altercations ensue, fangs and fur can fly. Unfortunately, a great many of these cases end in abscesses. A bite-wound abscess forms when the body can’t remove infection, inflammation, and damaged cells fast enough after one cat bites another, but there are other kinds of abscesses. An abscess causes a painful lump at the bite site, fever, and tiredness until the infection is cleared up, which will require antibiotics and possibly surgery, depending on the size and severity of the infection.

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Urinary Blockage in Cats: A Real Emergency

By DR. DONNA SPECTOR DVM, DACVIM  | Featured on Vetstreet

A urinary blockage occurs when there is an obstruction in the urethra, the tube that carries urine from the bladder to the outside of the body. When this happens it is difficult or impossible for a cat to empty the bladder, making it a life-threatening emergency. If your cat is having trouble urinating (see list below), do not delay in having him or her checked by your veterinarian.

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What is Canine Distemper?

Article Featured on Vetstreet.com

Prevention is the key with this disease. Distemper in dogs is caused by a virus which is spread through most body fluids including saliva, urine, and blood. It is highly contagious and often deadly. At first, the disease mimics kennel cough, with goopy eyes, fever, runny nose, coughing, and tiredness the most common symptoms. Later signs of infection include seizures and paralysis. That’s why getting the vaccination against the virus is critical.

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Chronic Ear Infections (Chronic Otitis) in Cats

Chronic otitis is basically a long-lasting ear infection that can affect any cat, causing itchy, painful ears. Quite a few things can cause the disease — parasites, allergies, growths, and more — which is progressive and can lead to rupture of the eardrum or even permanent narrowing of the ear canal. Treatment starts with cleaning the ear and using medications like antimicrobials and anti-inflammatories. However, in some cases, surgery may be the best option.

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What is Cat Scratch Disease? Sign & Symptoms of Bartonellosis

What is Cat Scratch Disease? Sign & Symptoms of Bartonellosis

Article Featured on Vetstreet.com

Most people have heard of “cat scratch fever” –– or at least they’ve heard the Ted Nugent song. But few know how the disease affects cats and, potentially, their people. The infection, officially called bartonellosis and caused by a bacteria carried by fleas, can bring on a host of symptoms in cats –– fever, sneezing, eye inflammation –– or none at all. And it can be transmitted to humans through a scratch or bite.

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