Sourced from PETA.

Fireworks have been a traditional part of America’s Fourth of July celebrations since the Declaration of Independence was signed in 1776. But as popular as fireworks displays are, animals don’t understand that the bursts of light and deafening explosions are just for fun. To them, Independence Day seems more like the end of days! Read more

source:https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/general-pet-care/fourth-july-safety-tips

For many people, nothing beats lounging in the backyard on the Fourth of July with good friends and family—including furry friends. While it may seem like a great idea to reward your pet with scraps from the grill and bring him along to watch fireworks, in reality some festive foods and activities can be potentially hazardous to him. The ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center offers the following tips: Read more

6 Helpful Christmas Safety Tips For Pet Owners

Article Featured on Dogtime

Before your family wakes up to see what trinkets Santa left under the tree Christmas morning, be sure that you have taken all of the proper precautions to keep your dogs and cats safe this holiday season.

While the holidays are fun for us humans, they can present a lot of dangers to our furry family members. Don’t let your Christmas get interrupted by a trip to the emergency vet! Here are a few Christmas safety tips to help you keep your fur family safe this holiday.

Read more

Holiday Pet Safety

Article Featured on AVMA

December abounds with holiday celebrations, but nothing can spoil good cheer like an emergency trip to the veterinary clinic. These tips can help keep your winter holiday season from becoming not-so-happy – for your pet and for you.

Read more

Thanksgiving Pet Safety

Article Featured on amva.org

Thanksgiving is a special holiday that brings together family and friends, but it also can carry some hazards for pets. Holiday food needs to be kept away from pets, and pet owners who travel need to either transport their pets safely or find safe accommodations for them at home. Follow these tips to keep your pets healthy and safe during the holiday.

Read more

7 Things You Can Do to Make Halloween Safer for Your Pet
Oregon Veterinary Specialty Hospital wants to make sure your pets have a fun and safe Halloween! Here are 7 things you can do to make Halloween safer for your pets!
Read more

Top Ten Fourth of July Pet Safety Tips

Top Ten Fourth of July Pet Safety Tips

Article By Yahaira Cespedes | Featured on PetMD
Like many Americans, you may be planning to have a festive Fourth of July. Along with barbeques and day at the beach, no July holiday celebration would be complete without enjoying the fireworks that celebrate the birth of our nation.
Both the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) and PAW have listed ways you can prevent your holiday celebration from turning into a tragedy. Here are 10 tips on how to keep your pet from panicking this Fourth of July weekend.
Read more

Halloween Safety Tips from ASPCAHalloween Safety Tips from ASPCA

Halloween can be the spookiest night of the year, but keeping your pets safe doesn’t have to be tricky. The ASPCA recommends taking these simple, common sense precautions to keep your pet happy and healthy all the way to November 1.
Stash the Treats
The candy bowl is for trick-or-treaters, not Scruffy or Fluffy. Several popular Halloween treats are toxic to pets. Chocolate in all forms—especially dark or baking chocolate—can be very dangerous for cats and dogs, and sugar-free candies containing the artificial sweetener xylitol can cause serious problems in pets. If you suspect your pet has ingested something toxic, please call your veterinarian or the ASPCA Poison Control Center at (888) 426-4435 immediately.
Watch the Decorations and Keep Wires Out of Reach
While a carved jack-o-lantern certainly is festive, pets can easily knock over a lit pumpkin and start a fire. Curious kittens are especially at risk of getting burned or singed by candle flame. Popular Halloween plants such as pumpkins and decorative corn are considered relatively nontoxic, but can produce stomach discomfort in pets who nibble on them.
Be Careful with Costumes
For some pets, wearing a costume may cause undue stress. The ASPCA recommends that you don’t put your dog or cat in a costume unless you know he or she loves it. If you do dress up your pet for Halloween, make sure the costume does not limit his or her movement, sight or ability to breathe, bark or meow. Check the costume carefully for small, dangling or easily chewed-off pieces that could present a choking hazard. Ill-fitting outfits can get twisted on external objects or your pet, leading to injury.
Be sure to have your pet try on the costume before the big night. If he or she seems distressed or shows abnormal behavior, consider letting your pet wear his or her “birthday suit” or don a festive bandana instead.
Keep Pets Calm and Easily Identifiable
Halloween brings a flurry of activity with visitors arriving at the door, and too many strangers can often be scary and stressful for pets. All but the most social dogs and cats should be kept in a separate room away from the front door during peak trick-or-treating hours. While opening the door for guests, be sure that your dog or cat doesn’t dart outside. And always make sure your pet it wearing proper identification—if for any reason he or she does escape, a collar with ID tags and/or a microchip can be a lifesaver for a lost pet.
Article from ASPCA: https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/general-pet-care/halloween-safety-tips
Oregon Veterinary Specialty Hospital (OVSH) has been serving the Portland and Beaverton area community since 1979. Drs. Steven F. Skinner (Neurology, Neurosurgery) and Robert T. Franklin (Internal medicine.) We welcome referrals from veterinarians all over the Pacific Northwest. Our goal is to help your pet regain health and live a long and happy life.

Oregon Veterinary Specialty Hospital

Address
9339 SW Beaverton Hillsdale Hwy,
Beaverton, OR 97005.
Phone: 503.292.3001
Fax: 503.292.6808
Email: info@ovshosp.com

by Carmela Stamper, DVM, Center for Veterinary Medicine, FDA
https://www.fda.gov/AnimalVeterinary/ResourcesforYou/AnimalHealthLiteracy/ucm195391.htm
Yes, it’s that holiday time of year again.  While you’re busy decorating, baking, wrapping gifts, and preparing your household for guests, remember to watch out for holiday temptations for your pets.  Don’t let a pet disaster turn both your and your pets’ Holiday “Ho-Ho-Ho!” into a Holiday “Oh No!”

Pet Treats

Santa brought Fido his favorite pet treats as a stocking stuffer.  Lucky Fido!  But, be careful when giving Fido his stocking stuffer.  Because he likes his favorite treats so much, Fido may eat them whole, or eat too many at one time.  Pet treats, whether biscuits, rawhides, or jerky sticks, are most digestible when chewed into small pieces.  If Fido eats the treats whole, or eats too many at once, he may not be able to digest them.  Unchewed pet treats can get stuck in the trachea (windpipe) or gastrointestinal tract (esophagus, stomach, and intestines), particularly in small dogs.
If a piece of pet treat gets stuck in Fido’s trachea (windpipe), you may see Fido become frantic and start drooling and choking.  Severe tracheal blockages are fairly common, especially around the holidays, and all are life-threatening.  So, if you see frantic Fido drooling and choking, he needs an emergency visit to his veterinarian!
If a piece of pet treat gets stuck in Fido’s esophagus (the tube that connects the mouth to the stomach that food travels through), he may gulp, start drooling, or bring up undigested food after eating.  Fido brings up the undigested food because the piece of pet treat blocks his dog food from getting to his stomach and there’s nowhere else for the food to go but back up.  This can go on for days if the blockage is not removed.
If something is stuck in Fido’s stomach or intestines, such as a bone or chew toy, the symptoms are different and you may not notice for several days.  He may vomit and have diarrhea, be less active, not want to eat, and have stomach pain.  If the blockage stays in Fido’s stomach or intestines for too long, he may become very ill.   The worst-case scenario is when a hole develops at the blockage site, causing a life-threatening infection.
In the cases above, Fido needs a visit to his veterinarian as soon as possible.  If he’s choking, it’s an emergency requiring immediate action.  When in doubt, contact your veterinarian for medical advice.  Your veterinarian may need to take X-rays, use ultrasound, or perform other tests to see what and where the problem is.  Your veterinarian may use an endoscope (a long tube with a built-in camera and grabbing tools) to remove reachable objects from the esophagus and stomach.  Fido will likely need surgery to remove blockages in the intestines.
Back to the top

Tinsel and Ribbons

When decorating your tree and wrapping or unwrapping gifts, keep a close eye on where you leave your leftover tinsel, string, and ribbons.  Tigger, your big orange and white kitty, may find these decorations irresistible because they look like easy-to-catch, sparkly, and wiggly prey.  If Tigger eats these types of decorations, he may end up with serious stomach and intestinal damage.  Swallowed ribbons and string can get tangled in the stomach or intestines.  If they are not removed, the ribbons and string can saw through the lining of the stomach or intestines, causing a life-threatening infection.  Symptoms may take a few hours or several days to appear, and include vomiting, diarrhea, lack of appetite, and decreased activity.  If you see Tigger eat any string, tinsel, or ribbon, call your veterinarian and ask for medical advice.  Play it safe—keep the tinsel off the tree and collect all ribbons and strings after opening your gifts!
Back to the top

Plants

Many people have festive plants around the house for the holidays, including poinsettias, holly, and mistletoe.  Remember to keep your furry family members in mind when you display or dispose of your holiday plants.
Poinsettias
Colorful, large red and white poinsettias fill your living room and family room, bringing holiday cheer to everyone who sees them.  However, Tigger sees the poinsettias and considers them a great hiding place and a convenient snack when you’re late with his dinner.
Unfortunately, what Tigger doesn’t realize is that poinsettias have a milky white, latex sap that can be very irritating to his mouth and stomach.  According to the National Animal Poison Control Center (NAPCC), symptoms of poinsettia toxicity include drooling, and sometimes, vomiting and diarrhea.  Fortunately for Tigger, the symptoms associated with poinsettia toxicity are not too bad.[1]  However, if Tigger snacks on your poinsettia leaves, you can help him by picking up his food and water dishes for a couple of hours to let his stomach settle.[2]
Mistletoe
Waiting for a kiss from that special someone under the mistletoe?  Tigger or Fido may also be waiting under the mistletoe in hopes of getting a tasty snack.  Your horse Trigger may also get a mistletoe snack if you hang it near her stall door or throw it into her field after the holiday celebrations are over.  If your pets eat mistletoe, what should you expect?  The NAPCC states that the major toxic chemicals in mistletoe are lectins and phoratoxins.  These chemicals affect the heart, causing low blood pressure and slowed heart rate.  Fortunately for Fido, Tigger, and Trigger, severe mistletoe toxicity is uncommon and usually only occurs if your pet eats a large amount. The symptoms of mistletoe toxicity include gastrointestinal upset (vomiting and diarrhea in dogs and cats; colic in horses), difficulty breathing, slowed heart rate, low blood pressure, and odd behavior.  If you suspect Fido, Tigger, or Trigger ate mistletoe, call your veterinarian for medical advice.
Holly
The beautiful holly decorating your house isn’t very harmful, but you should still keep Fido, Tigger, and Trigger from eating the berries and leaves.  The main toxic culprit in holly leaves and berries is a group of chemicals called saponins.  In dogs and cats, these chemicals cause drooling, vomiting, diarrhea, loss of appetite, and decreased activity.[3]  In horses, diarrhea can occur.[4]
In the three cases above, it’s a good idea to call your veterinarian. Your veterinarian can give you advice on what you can do at home to make your pet more comfortable and help you decide if you should bring your pet in for a visit.
Back to the top

Table Scraps

It’s hard to ignore Fido’s sad puppy-dog eyes when you’re eating your holiday meals.  However, resist the temptation to give him a piece of turkey or chicken, or some other type of fatty holiday comfort food.  In addition to the typical gastrointestinal upset (vomiting and diarrhea), rich and fatty foods can cause a potentially life-threatening and painful disease called pancreatitis.  The most common symptoms of pancreatitis in dogs include vomiting, stomach pain, restlessness, shaking, diarrhea, fever, and weakness.  In cats, the symptoms are less clear and harder to notice, such as decreased appetite and weight loss.[5]  Keep Fido and Tigger happy and healthy by resisting the temptation to give them table scraps!
You’ve done a great job, and neither Fido nor Tigger received any table scraps during your holiday meals.  However, disappointed Fido took the opportunity to help himself to the turkey, chicken, and steak bones in the trash can.  Eating bones is dangerous to Fido and the dangers are similar to what can happen with unchewed pet treats.  Bones can get stuck in his esophagus, leading to gagging, or they can get stuck in his trachea, leading to life-threatening choking.  Also, while Fido chews them up, bones form sharp pieces which can injure his mouth, esophagus, and stomach.  As the sharp bone pieces travel from the stomach through the intestines, they can cause punctures and injuries along the way, potentially leading to a life-threatening infection.  Bone pieces can also get stuck in the stomach and intestines, creating blockages that must be removed.
Hold your ground at dinnertime, and resist the urge to feed Fido and Tigger table scraps.  And don’t forget, once dinner is done, dispose of the leftovers and bones somewhere Fido and Tigger can’t get to them.
Back to the top

Human Treats

Fido, being the big dog he is, decides that eating the bones and leftovers from the trash can isn’t enough for his holiday dinner.  So, he table surfs in the living room and eats some of the chocolate-covered caramels in the candy dish along with several sugar-free red and white mints.  Can the chocolate and mints hurt him?  It depends.  Chocolate toxicity depends on the type and amount of chocolate Fido ate, his body weight, and if he’s extra-sensitive to the toxic compound in chocolate called theobromine.  Theobromine toxicity can cause a variety of symptoms, from mild to severe, including vomiting, diarrhea, fast heart rate, restlessness, hyperactivity, increased urination, muscle spasms, and seizures.[6]
The seemingly harmless sugar-free red and white mints you bought for your diabetic Uncle Ralph can cause life-threatening problems for Fido if the mints contain xylitol.  Xylitol, an increasingly popular sugar alcohol sweetener, is found in food items such as candy, gum, and baked goods, and personal hygiene products, such as toothpaste and mouthwash.[7]  Symptoms occur quickly after dogs eat xylitol-containing items.  Vomiting is generally the first symptom, followed by those associated with the sudden lowering of Fido’s blood sugar (hypoglycemia), such as decreased activity, weakness, staggering, incoordination, collapse, and seizures.  Some dogs develop more severe complications, including liver failure, bleeding disorders, and death.[8]  If you suspect Fido has eaten chocolate or xylitol-containing items, consider it an emergency and call your veterinarian immediately.
Alcohol is another potentially harmful human treat.  Fido and Tigger decide they need some holiday cheer and drink the entire glass of Aunt Susie’s eggnog that she left unattended on the coffee table.  Although it may seem funny at the time, pets that consume alcohol can develop serious problems depending on how much they drink.  The most common symptoms in pets associated with the consumption of alcoholic beverages are vomiting, diarrhea, incoordination, weakness, decreased activity, difficulty breathing, and shaking.  In severe cases, coma and death from respiratory failure (lungs stop functioning) occur.  If you see Fido and Tigger drinking an alcoholic beverage, call your veterinarian.
Back to the top

The “Wrap Up”

Don’t let the information in this article scare you into paranoia about your pets and your holiday celebrations.  You can relax and enjoy your holidays simply by preventing temptations for your pets.  Keep holiday decorations, people food, alcoholic beverages, and holiday plants out of reach of your furry friends.  If your pets get into things they shouldn’t, don’t panic!  Call your veterinarian immediately for advice instead of waiting for serious symptoms to develop.  Remember, only you can keep the “Oh No!” out of your and your pets’ Holiday “Ho-Ho-Ho!”
Back to the top

How Can You Get More Information?

 


Oregon Veterinary Specialty Hospital (OVSH) has been serving the Portland and Beaverton area community since 1979. Drs. Steven F. Skinner (Neurology, Neurosurgery) and Robert T. Franklin (Internal medicine.) We welcome referrals from veterinarians all over the Pacific Northwest. Our goal is to help your pet regain health and live a long and happy life.

Oregon Veterinary Specialty Hospital

Address
9339 SW Beaverton Hillsdale Hwy,
Beaverton, OR 97005.
Phone: 503.292.3001
Fax: 503.292.6808
Email: info@ovshosp.com
Save
Save

by Carmela Stamper, DVM, Center for Veterinary Medicine, FDA
https://www.fda.gov/AnimalVeterinary/ResourcesforYou/AnimalHealthLiteracy/ucm195391.htm
Yes, it’s that holiday time of year again.  While you’re busy decorating, baking, wrapping gifts, and preparing your household for guests, remember to watch out for holiday temptations for your pets.  Don’t let a pet disaster turn both your and your pets’ Holiday “Ho-Ho-Ho!” into a Holiday “Oh No!”

Pet Treats

Santa brought Fido his favorite pet treats as a stocking stuffer.  Lucky Fido!  But, be careful when giving Fido his stocking stuffer.  Because he likes his favorite treats so much, Fido may eat them whole, or eat too many at one time.  Pet treats, whether biscuits, rawhides, or jerky sticks, are most digestible when chewed into small pieces.  If Fido eats the treats whole, or eats too many at once, he may not be able to digest them.  Unchewed pet treats can get stuck in the trachea (windpipe) or gastrointestinal tract (esophagus, stomach, and intestines), particularly in small dogs.
If a piece of pet treat gets stuck in Fido’s trachea (windpipe), you may see Fido become frantic and start drooling and choking.  Severe tracheal blockages are fairly common, especially around the holidays, and all are life-threatening.  So, if you see frantic Fido drooling and choking, he needs an emergency visit to his veterinarian!
If a piece of pet treat gets stuck in Fido’s esophagus (the tube that connects the mouth to the stomach that food travels through), he may gulp, start drooling, or bring up undigested food after eating.  Fido brings up the undigested food because the piece of pet treat blocks his dog food from getting to his stomach and there’s nowhere else for the food to go but back up.  This can go on for days if the blockage is not removed.
If something is stuck in Fido’s stomach or intestines, such as a bone or chew toy, the symptoms are different and you may not notice for several days.  He may vomit and have diarrhea, be less active, not want to eat, and have stomach pain.  If the blockage stays in Fido’s stomach or intestines for too long, he may become very ill.   The worst-case scenario is when a hole develops at the blockage site, causing a life-threatening infection.
In the cases above, Fido needs a visit to his veterinarian as soon as possible.  If he’s choking, it’s an emergency requiring immediate action.  When in doubt, contact your veterinarian for medical advice.  Your veterinarian may need to take X-rays, use ultrasound, or perform other tests to see what and where the problem is.  Your veterinarian may use an endoscope (a long tube with a built-in camera and grabbing tools) to remove reachable objects from the esophagus and stomach.  Fido will likely need surgery to remove blockages in the intestines.
Back to the top

Tinsel and Ribbons

When decorating your tree and wrapping or unwrapping gifts, keep a close eye on where you leave your leftover tinsel, string, and ribbons.  Tigger, your big orange and white kitty, may find these decorations irresistible because they look like easy-to-catch, sparkly, and wiggly prey.  If Tigger eats these types of decorations, he may end up with serious stomach and intestinal damage.  Swallowed ribbons and string can get tangled in the stomach or intestines.  If they are not removed, the ribbons and string can saw through the lining of the stomach or intestines, causing a life-threatening infection.  Symptoms may take a few hours or several days to appear, and include vomiting, diarrhea, lack of appetite, and decreased activity.  If you see Tigger eat any string, tinsel, or ribbon, call your veterinarian and ask for medical advice.  Play it safe—keep the tinsel off the tree and collect all ribbons and strings after opening your gifts!
Back to the top

Plants

Many people have festive plants around the house for the holidays, including poinsettias, holly, and mistletoe.  Remember to keep your furry family members in mind when you display or dispose of your holiday plants.
Poinsettias
Colorful, large red and white poinsettias fill your living room and family room, bringing holiday cheer to everyone who sees them.  However, Tigger sees the poinsettias and considers them a great hiding place and a convenient snack when you’re late with his dinner.
Unfortunately, what Tigger doesn’t realize is that poinsettias have a milky white, latex sap that can be very irritating to his mouth and stomach.  According to the National Animal Poison Control Center (NAPCC), symptoms of poinsettia toxicity include drooling, and sometimes, vomiting and diarrhea.  Fortunately for Tigger, the symptoms associated with poinsettia toxicity are not too bad.[1]  However, if Tigger snacks on your poinsettia leaves, you can help him by picking up his food and water dishes for a couple of hours to let his stomach settle.[2]
Mistletoe
Waiting for a kiss from that special someone under the mistletoe?  Tigger or Fido may also be waiting under the mistletoe in hopes of getting a tasty snack.  Your horse Trigger may also get a mistletoe snack if you hang it near her stall door or throw it into her field after the holiday celebrations are over.  If your pets eat mistletoe, what should you expect?  The NAPCC states that the major toxic chemicals in mistletoe are lectins and phoratoxins.  These chemicals affect the heart, causing low blood pressure and slowed heart rate.  Fortunately for Fido, Tigger, and Trigger, severe mistletoe toxicity is uncommon and usually only occurs if your pet eats a large amount. The symptoms of mistletoe toxicity include gastrointestinal upset (vomiting and diarrhea in dogs and cats; colic in horses), difficulty breathing, slowed heart rate, low blood pressure, and odd behavior.  If you suspect Fido, Tigger, or Trigger ate mistletoe, call your veterinarian for medical advice.
Holly
The beautiful holly decorating your house isn’t very harmful, but you should still keep Fido, Tigger, and Trigger from eating the berries and leaves.  The main toxic culprit in holly leaves and berries is a group of chemicals called saponins.  In dogs and cats, these chemicals cause drooling, vomiting, diarrhea, loss of appetite, and decreased activity.[3]  In horses, diarrhea can occur.[4]
In the three cases above, it’s a good idea to call your veterinarian. Your veterinarian can give you advice on what you can do at home to make your pet more comfortable and help you decide if you should bring your pet in for a visit.
Back to the top

Table Scraps

It’s hard to ignore Fido’s sad puppy-dog eyes when you’re eating your holiday meals.  However, resist the temptation to give him a piece of turkey or chicken, or some other type of fatty holiday comfort food.  In addition to the typical gastrointestinal upset (vomiting and diarrhea), rich and fatty foods can cause a potentially life-threatening and painful disease called pancreatitis.  The most common symptoms of pancreatitis in dogs include vomiting, stomach pain, restlessness, shaking, diarrhea, fever, and weakness.  In cats, the symptoms are less clear and harder to notice, such as decreased appetite and weight loss.[5]  Keep Fido and Tigger happy and healthy by resisting the temptation to give them table scraps!
You’ve done a great job, and neither Fido nor Tigger received any table scraps during your holiday meals.  However, disappointed Fido took the opportunity to help himself to the turkey, chicken, and steak bones in the trash can.  Eating bones is dangerous to Fido and the dangers are similar to what can happen with unchewed pet treats.  Bones can get stuck in his esophagus, leading to gagging, or they can get stuck in his trachea, leading to life-threatening choking.  Also, while Fido chews them up, bones form sharp pieces which can injure his mouth, esophagus, and stomach.  As the sharp bone pieces travel from the stomach through the intestines, they can cause punctures and injuries along the way, potentially leading to a life-threatening infection.  Bone pieces can also get stuck in the stomach and intestines, creating blockages that must be removed.
Hold your ground at dinnertime, and resist the urge to feed Fido and Tigger table scraps.  And don’t forget, once dinner is done, dispose of the leftovers and bones somewhere Fido and Tigger can’t get to them.
Back to the top

Human Treats

Fido, being the big dog he is, decides that eating the bones and leftovers from the trash can isn’t enough for his holiday dinner.  So, he table surfs in the living room and eats some of the chocolate-covered caramels in the candy dish along with several sugar-free red and white mints.  Can the chocolate and mints hurt him?  It depends.  Chocolate toxicity depends on the type and amount of chocolate Fido ate, his body weight, and if he’s extra-sensitive to the toxic compound in chocolate called theobromine.  Theobromine toxicity can cause a variety of symptoms, from mild to severe, including vomiting, diarrhea, fast heart rate, restlessness, hyperactivity, increased urination, muscle spasms, and seizures.[6]
The seemingly harmless sugar-free red and white mints you bought for your diabetic Uncle Ralph can cause life-threatening problems for Fido if the mints contain xylitol.  Xylitol, an increasingly popular sugar alcohol sweetener, is found in food items such as candy, gum, and baked goods, and personal hygiene products, such as toothpaste and mouthwash.[7]  Symptoms occur quickly after dogs eat xylitol-containing items.  Vomiting is generally the first symptom, followed by those associated with the sudden lowering of Fido’s blood sugar (hypoglycemia), such as decreased activity, weakness, staggering, incoordination, collapse, and seizures.  Some dogs develop more severe complications, including liver failure, bleeding disorders, and death.[8]  If you suspect Fido has eaten chocolate or xylitol-containing items, consider it an emergency and call your veterinarian immediately.
Alcohol is another potentially harmful human treat.  Fido and Tigger decide they need some holiday cheer and drink the entire glass of Aunt Susie’s eggnog that she left unattended on the coffee table.  Although it may seem funny at the time, pets that consume alcohol can develop serious problems depending on how much they drink.  The most common symptoms in pets associated with the consumption of alcoholic beverages are vomiting, diarrhea, incoordination, weakness, decreased activity, difficulty breathing, and shaking.  In severe cases, coma and death from respiratory failure (lungs stop functioning) occur.  If you see Fido and Tigger drinking an alcoholic beverage, call your veterinarian.
Back to the top

The “Wrap Up”

Don’t let the information in this article scare you into paranoia about your pets and your holiday celebrations.  You can relax and enjoy your holidays simply by preventing temptations for your pets.  Keep holiday decorations, people food, alcoholic beverages, and holiday plants out of reach of your furry friends.  If your pets get into things they shouldn’t, don’t panic!  Call your veterinarian immediately for advice instead of waiting for serious symptoms to develop.  Remember, only you can keep the “Oh No!” out of your and your pets’ Holiday “Ho-Ho-Ho!”
Back to the top

How Can You Get More Information?

 


Oregon Veterinary Specialty Hospital (OVSH) has been serving the Portland and Beaverton area community since 1979. Drs. Steven F. Skinner (Neurology, Neurosurgery) and Robert T. Franklin (Internal medicine.) We welcome referrals from veterinarians all over the Pacific Northwest. Our goal is to help your pet regain health and live a long and happy life.

Oregon Veterinary Specialty Hospital

Address
9339 SW Beaverton Hillsdale Hwy,
Beaverton, OR 97005.
Phone: 503.292.3001
Fax: 503.292.6808
Email: info@ovshosp.com
Save
Save