specialty vet clinic, beaverton, oregon

Unraveling the Genetics of Disc Disease in Dogs

Article Found on Science Daily

Since the early 1900s, veterinarians have observed intervertebral disc disease — a common cause of back pain, rear limb paralysis and inability to walk — more frequently in dogs with short legs (dachshund, French bulldog, and Pekingese to name a few.) But they couldn’t pinpoint why — until now.

This week, University of California, Davis, researchers reveal the discovery of a genetic mutation across breeds that is responsible for chondrodystrophy (the skeletal disorder leading to shorter legs and abnormal intervertebral discs) in a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Read more

specialty veterinary clinic, beaverton

Unraveling the Genetics of Disc Disease in Dogs

Article Found on ScienceDaily

Since the early 1900s, veterinarians have observed intervertebral disc disease — a common cause of back pain, rear limb paralysis and inability to walk — more frequently in dogs with short legs (dachshund, French bulldog, and Pekingese to name a few.) But they couldn’t pinpoint why — until now. Read more

beaverton, specialty vet hospital

Slipped Disc, Bad Back, and Muscle Spasms in Cats

Article Found on PetMD

Intervertebral Disc Disease (IVDD) in Cats

Although intervertebral disc disease (IVDD) is seen less frequently in cats than dogs, it is still a serious condition. IVDD occurs when the cushioning discs between the vertebrae of the spinal column either bulge or burst (herniate) into the spinal cord space. These discs then press on the nerves running through the spinal cord causing pain, nerve damage, and even paralysis. Read more

Degenerative Myelopathy

Degenerative Myelopathy – Disease Basics

Article & Images Featured on CanineGeneticDiseases.com

What is Degenerative Myelopathy?

Degenerative myelopathy is a progressive disease of the spinal cord in older dogs. The disease has an insidious onset typically between 8 and 14 years of age. It begins with a loss of coordination (ataxia) in the hind limbs. The affected dog will wobble when walking, knuckle over or drag the feet. This can first occur in one hind limb and then affect the other. As the disease progresses, the limbs become weak and the dog begins to buckle and has difficulty standing. The weakness gets progressively worse until the dog is unable to walk. The clinical course can range from 6 months to 1 year before dogs become paraplegic. If signs progress for a longer period of time, loss of urinary and fecal continence may occur and eventually weakness will develop in the front limbs. Another key feature of DM is that it is not a painful disease.

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Spine Injuries in Dogs

Fibrocartilaginous Embolic Myelopathy in Dogs

Fibrocartilaginous embolic myelopathy in dogs is a condition in which an area of the spinal cord is not able to function properly and eventually atrophies as a result of a blockage, or emboli, in the blood vessels of the spinal cord. The cause of this disorder is typically the result of an injury to the spine. The injury may be the result of jumping and landing in the wrong way, vigorous exercise, fighting, or any accident that leads to a spinal injury.
The highest number of cases tends to occur in giant and large breed dogs. Miniature schnauzers and Shetland sheepdogs are reported to be more prone to this injury. The reason has not been determined for why this is, but a suspected underlying condition of hyperlipoproteinemia that is commonly seen in these breeds is considered. Most cases occur between the ages of three and five years.
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Canine Degenerative Myelopathy

Canine Degenerative Myelopathy

Canine degenerative myelopathy (also known as chronic degenerative radiculomyelopathy) otherwise known as DM or CDRM is a progressive disease of the spinal cord of unknown origin in older dogs. The disease has an insidious onset typically between 7 and 14 years of age. It begins with a loss of coordination in the hind limbs. It eventually causes weakness and then leads to paralysis in the back legs. With this disease, the myelin sheaths around spinal neurons start to slowly disintegrate. As these protective tissues deteriorate and the underlying nerve fibers (axons) degenerate, the communication pathways between the brain and spinal cord become disrupted. DM is thought to be an immune-mediated, neurodegenerative disease similar to multiple sclerosis in people, although other possible causes have been suggested. There is no known pattern of inheritance with this disorder, but because it shows up primarily in purebred dogs of certain breeds, a genetic component is suspected. Clinical signs appear gradually and worsen with time. It can take months to years for full pelvic paralysis to develop. While there currently is no cure for this condition, early recognition of clinical signs, prompt diagnosis and timely treatment can help delay its advancement.
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Intervertebral Disc Disease in Dogs - OVSH

Understanding Intervertebral Disc Disease in Dogs

The intervertebral disc (IVD) is a shock absorbing and stabilizing structure between the vertebrae (spinal bones). There is a disc between all vertebrae in the neck, back, and tail, except between the first two cervical (neck) vertebrae. Each disc has two components: the outer portion is a thick, interwoven bundle of tough fibrous tissues; the center is a gel-like mix of fluid and cartilage tissue.
In most dogs the discs gradually degenerate over the course of a lifetime. This gradual degenerative process can frequently be seen with radiographs (x-rays) and is called spondylosis. The most characteristic finding is the formation of bony spurs along the bottom of one, several, or most vertebrae. In most dogs this degeneration is not associated with any signs of pain or weakness.
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ivd2

Intervertebral Disc Disease (IVDD) in Dogs

Intervertebral disc disease (IVDD) is a condition where the cushioning discs between the vertebrae of the spinal column either bulge or burst (herniate) into the spinal cord space. These discs then press on the nerves running through the spinal cord causing pain, nerve damage, and even paralysis.
Breeds of dog that are predisposed to IVDD include the Dachshund, Beagle, Basset Hound, and Shih Tzu. Read more