Article Featured on Vetstreet.com

Even dogs eating healthy diets can suffer from diabetes. As with diabetes in humans, sometimes a dog’s body’s stops producing enough insulin or the cells of a dog’s body are unable to use the insulin that is produced. When either condition occurs, the result is diabetes mellitus, which causes excessive thirst and urination and extreme hunger accompanied by weight loss. To stabilize sugar levels, insulin therapy is the treatment at the outset and is usually required for the life of the dog.

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What Food is Best for a Cat with Diabetes?
Article Featured on PetMD

What Food is Best for a Cat with Diabetes?

The great majority of diabetic cats have what is called Type 2 diabetes. This means that, early in the course of the disease at least, they are still producing levels of insulin that should be adequate for normal body function. The problem is that the rest of the body has become less sensitive to insulin, almost always due in large part to the hormonal effects of obesity. To have an effect on blood sugar levels, the pancreas has to crank out ever higher amounts of insulin, which eventually exhausts the pancreatic beta cells responsible for insulin production.
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5 Signs Your Pet May Have Diabetes

Article by Janet Kim | Found on Everyday Health
Have a beloved dog or cat? You may be surprised to learn that, like people, our pets can develop chronic health conditions such as diabetes, and their risk is also greater if they are overweight or obese.
As the number of Americans with diabetes continues to grow, a similar trend is also happening among cats and dogs in the United States, according to Christopher G. Byers, DVM, a board-certified veterinary specialist at MidWest Veterinary Specialty Hospital in Omaha, Neb. Read more

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Diabetes in Dogs: Type 1 vs. Type 2

Article Found on PetMD | By Hanie Elfenbein, DVM
Diabetes in dogs is not a death sentence. It takes dedication, but your dog can still live a long, happy life. Diabetes means that the body is unable to use glucose (sugar) appropriately. This leads to high levels of sugar in the blood, which can cause many health problems.
Just like humans, our pets can get both Type I and Type II diabetes. Type I diabetes is also known as insulin-deficiency. It is due to the body’s inability to produce insulin. Insulin is normally produced in the pancreas and is important in helping cells use glucose (sugar), the basic energy source. Our digestive systems are designed to turn food into glucose for cells to use. Without insulin, glucose cannot get into cells. People and animals with Type I diabetes need to be given insulin so that their body can use glucose. Read more

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5 Reasons to Test Your Dog for Diabetes

Article by Dr. Justine A. Lee, DVM, DACVECC | Found on Pet Health Network
Did you know that some authorities feel that 1 out of every 100 dogs that reaches 12 years of age develops diabetes mellitus1?
Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a hormonal problem where the pancreas fails to produce enough insulin, the hormone that helps push sugar (“glucose”) into the body’s cells. Without the insulin, the body’s cells are starving for sugar; unfortunately, this then stimulates the body to produce more and more sugar (in an attempt to feed the cells). That’s why your dog’s blood sugar is so high (what we call a “hyperglycemia”) with diabetes mellitus.
Without insulin, the sugar can’t get into the cells; hence, why you need to give insulin to your dog with a tiny syringe twice a day. In dogs, this is a disease that can be costly to treat and requires twice-a-day insulin along with frequent veterinary visits for the rest of your dog’s life. Read more

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Diabetes in Dogs and Cats: Everything You Need to Know

Article by Jessica Vogelsang, DVM | Found on PetMD
Certain triggers cause us vet types to start thinking in overdrive during our examinations of pets. A seemingly innocent question, like “How’s his appetite? Has he been drinking more or less than usual?” can actually represent a significant clue in our hunt for answers. A dog or cat, for example, who suddenly starts drinking and urinating a ton more than usual is giving us a big hint that something is wrong with its body—and of the several possible causes, diabetes is one that owners seem to dread hearing the most.
As one of the most common health conditions in middle-aged cats and dogs, a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus is frightening for owners. And it’s true, diabetes is usually a lifelong condition that requires vigilance on the part of owners in order to control. But that also leads to the good news: in many cases it can be managed, and often pets with diabetes continue on to lead long and happy lives. Read more

45 Cats In New York City Shelter Infected With Rare Bird Flu

45 Cats In New York City Shelter Infected With Rare Bird Flu
By Aly Semigran  | Article Featured on PetMD
On December 15, the Health Department and the Animal Care Centers of New York City announced that a rare strain of bird flu was found in 45 cats in one Manhattan shelter.
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Top Ten Signs Your Pet Has Diabetes
Article Featured on PetMD

Recognize the Pet Diabetes Epidemic

November is nationally recognized as American Diabetes Month, a month focused on raising awareness about diabetes in people. Not as commonly known is that November is also recognized as Pet Diabetes Awareness Month. A growing epidemic amongst our pets, recognizing and spreading awareness about diabetes in dogs and cats is vital to helping pet owners spot and treat the disorder early.
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5 Reasons to Test Your Dog for Diabetes
Article By Dr. Justine A. Lee, DVM, DACVECC | Featured on Pet Health Network
Did you know that some authorities feel that 1 out of every 100 dogs that reaches 12 years of age develops diabetes mellitus1?
Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a hormonal problem where the pancreas fails to produce enough insulin, the hormone that helps push sugar (“glucose”) into the body’s cells. Without the insulin, the body’s cells are starving for sugar; unfortunately, this then stimulates the body to produce more and more sugar (in an attempt to feed the cells). That’s why your dog’s blood sugar is so high (what we call a “hyperglycemia”) with diabetes mellitus.
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bennie

Case report: An Aldosterone-secreting Adrenal Tumor in a Cat

Elizabeth Appleman, VMD, DACVIM |  Fifth Avenue Veterinary Specialists
“Bennie,” a 9-year-old MC domestic shorthair was referred to Fifth Avenue Veterinary Specialists on June 16, 2009, for further evaluation of hyperaldosteronism and uncontrolled diabetes mellitus.
The initial work-up and treatment was performed by Dr. Dan Lauridia at Murray Hill Pet Hospital, in Manhattan. Previously in October 2008, Bennie was presented to Murray Hill for general weakness. He was subsequently diagnosed with hypokalemia (2.9 mmol/L), high baseline aldosterone level (2488 pmol/L, reference range 194-388 pmol/L), and persistent hypertension (200-240 mmHg). A full work-up was otherwise normal (including full bloodwork, sodium concentration, thyroid level, urinalysis, and acetylcholine antibody receptor level). An echocardiogram showed mild left ventricular hypertrophy, likely due to systemic hypertension. On abdominal ultrasound, both adrenal glands appeared normal in size and echotexture.
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