Top 10 Signs of Cancer in Dogs

Article by Christine McLaughlin | DogTime

It’s a dog owner’s worst nightmare hearing the four words: “Your dog has cancer.” But it’s a stark reality for many. In fact, one in three dogs will develop cancer, according to the National Canine Cancer Foundation. Cancer occurs in both mixed breed and purebred dogs (depending on the cancer, some breeds like Great Danes, Saint Bernards, Boxers, Boston Terriers, and Golden Retrievers are considered at high risk). Canine cancer can happen at any age but most often it occurs in older dogs, which is partially because dogs are living longer due to modern, enhanced nutrition and veterinary care.

What Is Cancer?

But first it’s important to define cancer. Cancer is a disease where cells grow out of control, invade surrounding tissue, and can spread (metastasize). Just like in humans, cancer can take many forms in dogs. The disease can be localized (in one area) or generalized (spread throughout the body). Cancer is considered multifactorial, which means it has no known single cause but heredity and the environment are thought to be factors. Read more


Article by By Sandy Eckstein | Featured in  Pets WebMD

Although cancer isn’t as common in cats as it is in dogs, it still affects a number of our feline friends. And because cats have a tendency to mask illnesses, it can be harder to detect. This often leads to later diagnoses and more difficult and costly treatments. So we talked to Dave Ruslander, a veterinary oncologist and past president of the Veterinary Cancer Society, about feline cancers and the latest treatments for cats diagnosed with the disease.

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Osteosarcoma in Dogs

Osteosarcoma in Dogs

Osteosarcoma refers to the most common bone tumor found in dogs. Bone cancer can affect any breed of dog, but it is more commonly found in the larger breeds.
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8 Types of Dog Tumors and How to Treat Them

8 Types of Dog Tumors and How to Treat Them

By John Gilpatrick | Featured on PetMD
A cancerous tumor is among the most devastating diagnoses a veterinarian will give to a dog.
That’s because cancer is both extremely common in dogs and a leading cause of death. The National Cancer Institute’s Center for Cancer Research says that about 6 million of the 65 million pet dogs in the United States will be diagnosed with cancer each year.
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Melanocytic Tumors of the Skin and Digits in Dogs
Article Featured on PetMD
Melanocytic tumors are benign or cancerous growths, arising from melanocytes (pigment-producing skin cells) and melanoblasts (melanin-producing cells that develop or mature into melanocytes). These tumors do not seem to have a genetic basis; however, males, especially Scottish Terriers, Boston Terriers, Airedale Terriers, Cocker Spaniels, Boxers, English Springer Spaniels, Irish Setters, Irish Terriers, Chow Chows, Chihuahuas, Schnauzers, and Doberman Pinschers, seem to have a predilection to the condition. Dogs 10 years or older are also more prone to melanocytic tumors.
In addition, melanocytic tumors can be found in both dogs and cats.
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Staging for Canine and Feline Cancer Patients – The Blood Testing Stage

Staging for Canine and Feline Cancer Patients – The Blood Testing Stage

by Dr. Patrick Mahaney | Featured on PetMD
Now that you’ve read The Importance of Staging for Pets With Cancer, Part 1, it’s time to move on to the next group of diagnostics used when staging cancer patient.
Staging is the process of combining a veterinarian’s physical examination with a variety of diagnostic tests to help determine if the presence of cancer is detectable or not. If the cancer is undetectable, then a pet can still be considered to be in remission. If the cancer is detectable, then the pet is not in remission.
The tests used by the overseeing veterinarian vary depending on the individual nature of the patient’s case and sometimes on the owner’s financial situation or desires to have a pet go through certain diagnostic procedures, or not, but some tests are more common than others.
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What is 'Staging' and Why Is it Important for the Pet Cancer Patient?

What is ‘Staging’ and Why Is it Important for the Pet Cancer Patient?

Article Featured on PetMD | by Dr. Patrick Mahaney
When a pet is diagnosed with cancer, the degree to which the body is affected by disease often isn’t immediately obvious. While an owner may see a mass-like a lesion on a pet’s limb, masses having the same or different cellular makeup can potentially lurk elsewhere in the body.
For descriptive purposes, I use the term mass-like lesion when referring to any tissue swelling.  While the mass-like lesion may be composed of a benign or malignant cancer, there also could be single or multiple other disease processes occurring, including:

  • Abscess – pocket of white blood cells and bacteria
  • Cyst – pocket of fluid, commonly associated with glandular tissue like a sebaceous (oil-containing) cyst
  • Urticaria – “hive,” such as that which occurs from a hypersensitivity (“allergic”) reaction caused by an insect bite or sting, vaccination, or other cause
  • Foreign body reaction – any foreign material that enters the body, such as a splinter, plant awn (foxtail, etc.), medical implant, or other can create a response where the body attempts to wall off the offending material to protect normal tissues from harm and potentially push the foreign material out of the body.
  • Other

When concern for cancer arises, we veterinarians must take a whole-body approach when establishing our patients’ diagnoses and creating a treatment plan. This process is called staging and it has numerous components, which I will cover in this multipart article.
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Long-term Golden Retriever Study Hopes to Learn More About Cancer in Dogs

Long-term Golden Retriever Study Hopes to Learn More About Cancer in Dogs

by Dr. Jessica Vogelsang | Featured on PetMD
This week, I received the happy word that the latest mass I had removed from Brody was benign. Given that he has already dealt with two big baddies—melanoma and mast cell tumor, the latter necessitating the amputation of his ear—this is a big deal. I’m not going to lie, I did a little happy dance.
I’m ever vigilant because Brody is a Golden Retriever, and 60 percent of Goldens die from cancer. All of mine have. And given that this percentage is higher in this breed than in the general canine population, it stands to reason that there is probably a genetic component in there that predisposes a dog to cancer.
Despite what the internet rumor mill will have you believe, cancer is complicated, and it’s going to take a lot more than feeding organic food to get to the root of the problem.
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How We Treat Malignant Oral Tumors in Cats and Dogs

How We Treat Malignant Oral Tumors in Cats and Dogs

Article by Dr. Joanne Intile | Featured on PetMD
Dogs and cats are frequently diagnosed with tumors of the oral cavity. This diverse group of cancers includes growths along the gingiva (gum), lips, tongue, tonsils, the bones and cartilage of the upper and lower jaws, and the structural components holding the teeth in place.
The most common oral tumors in dogs are melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and fibrosarcoma. In cats, the most common tumor is squamous cell carcinoma, above all others.
Oral tumors are typically diagnosed at a relatively advanced disease stage, when they are causing significant clinical signs for the patient. This can include drooling (with or without evidence of bleeding), halitosis (bad breath), difficulty eating and/or drinking, facial swelling, and/or signs of oral pain (pawing at the mouth or repeated opening/closing of the mouth.)
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10 Warning Signs of Cancer in Your Dog

A Vet Shares 10 Warning Signs of Cancer in Your Dog

Article Featured on iheartdogs
Everyone knows that the quicker you find and diagnose cancer, the better chance you have at fighting if off and prolonging your dog’s life. While annual check-ups at the vet are important for bringing your attention to something you may not have been aware of, a year in the fight against cancer is just too long.
Be proactive and look for signs that your dog, regardless of age, may have cancer. Dr. Kelly Ryan, DVM, at the Animal Medical Center of Mid-America and Humane Society of Missouri has 10 warning signs that dog owners should know and watch for.
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