By Dr. Karen Shaw Becker
If your canine BFF is getting up in years, you’ve probably noticed some physical changes in him. For example, many dogs’ coats, especially around the face, tend to go grey or white as they age. You may also have noticed he’s getting up a little more slowly these days, or taking more frequent or longer naps than he did when he was younger.
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By Dr. Karen Shaw Becker

If your canine BFF is getting up in years, you’ve probably noticed some physical changes in him. For example, many dogs’ coats, especially around the face, tend to go grey or white as they age. You may also have noticed he’s getting up a little more slowly these days, or taking more frequent or longer naps than he did when he was younger.

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When to Worry if Your Pet Refuses to Eat

Written by Dr. Karen Shaw Becker | Article Featured on Mercola Pets

Generally speaking, healthy dogs and cats love mealtime. That’s why a change in appetite — especially a decreased interest in eating — is something pet parents and veterinarians must closely monitor.

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Can Dogs Get Hemorrhoids?

By Sarah Wooten, DVM | Article Featured on PetMD

In humans, a hemorrhoid is defined as a swollen blood vessel in the lower rectum or anus. They can be internal or protrude externally, and can range from very painful to mildly uncomfortable—a real pain in the you know where.

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Dogs and Kidney Disease

By  | Article Featured on Spruce Pets

Kidney disease is a serious health problem in dogs that require medical attention. Other common terms for kidney disease include renal failure, kidney failure, and renal insufficiency. As a dog owner, it will be helpful for you to understand the different forms of kidney disease and the signs that indicate kidney disease. When a dog’s kidneys are not working properly, it can affect every other system in the body.

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5 Subtle Yet Visible Signs that Your Cat is Aging

5 Subtle Yet Visible Signs that Your Cat is Aging

By Jessica Vogelsang, DVM | Featured on PetMD
“Cats are the great pretenders.” So goes one of the common tropes of feline ownership, and in many cases it’s true. Cats are subtle creatures, not ones for making a big scene whenever they feel under the weather. But subtle or not, cats are susceptible to just as many symptoms of aging as the rest of us, particularly as they approach their senior years. The good news is astute pet owners looking for small changes can spot many signs of aging as long as they know what to look for.
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What to Expect When Your Kitty Becomes a Senior Cat

What to Expect When Your Kitty Becomes a Senior Cat

By Dr. Ken Lambrecht | Featured on PetMD
My 15-year-old cat, Lance, sits next to me as I write this piece. He is special to me because he is  the oldest of my four cats and we have shared quite a bit of time together. Caring for him helps me to cross-check the guidance I give to anyone who is sharing their life with a senior cat and wants to provide them with the very best care. Owner observations and vigilance, regular veterinary exams, and wellness testing are the four cornerstones of excellent senior cat care.
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Original Article By Petmd

Cancer is the #1 Disease-Related Killer of Pets

Many people do not realize that cancer is not just a human condition; it affects Read more

Summer heat can be dangerous for your pets!

Story by: Trisha Gedon Original Link
Summer is in full swing, and with it comes many opportunities to enjoy the outdoors. Pet owners often like spending time outside with family, friends and pets.
A lot of animals like spending time outside, and therefore, pet owners need to take precautions to ensure their animals stay safe in the summer heat, said Dr. Laura Nafe, assistant professor of small animal internal medicine at the Oklahoma State University Center for Veterinary Health Sciences.
“Just as you hydrate yourself and take precautions such as applying sunscreen and staying cool in the heat, it’s vital to keep a close eye on your pet when spending time outdoors, especially on a hot, sunny day,” Nafe said.
Dogs do not sweat like humans. Instead, they cool themselves primarily by panting. Excessive panting indicates your pet is overheated. Dogs also will seek shade to help cool themselves in the heat of the summer, and they enjoy a nice, cool breeze just like the rest of us.
“If you’re out for a walk or playing in the yard and your dog stops to sit or lie down, he is telling you that he is unable to keep cool enough for the activity,” she said. “A dog’s gums can be a good indicator of being overheated. Gums often appear more red early on when an animal is overheated, and become more pale if the dog is excessively overheated. In addition, a dog’s gums may be dry or sticky if the animal is not staying adequately hydrated.”
If you are spending time at a pond or lake with your dog, do not assume your pet will drink water from that source. Always bring water and a bowl with you and try to keep the water cool if possible. Your dog is likely accustomed to and prefers city water.
Dogs often love to travel in the car with you. Unfortunately, one of the most life-threatening mistakes people can make is to leave a pet in a vehicle in hot weather.
“Never, ever leave your dog in the car, even with the windows open. Cars heat up very quickly. As an example, on an 80-degree day, a car can heat up to 110 degrees in approximately 15 minutes,” Nafe said. “We’re well beyond the 80 degree days at this point in the summer, so extra precaution is necessary.”
Because dogs pant to keep themselves cool, taking in the hot air inside a vehicle has little cooling effect, and the animal will quickly overheat. Your pet may overheat and develop signs of heatstroke even after a few minutes spent in a sweltering car. As much as you enjoy your pet’s company, and as much as the pet enjoys a ride in the car, it is better to leave your pet at home on hot days.
Pet owners who enjoy going for a walk or run with their dog must remember asphalt gets very hot during the summer—hot enough to burn the pads on a dog’s foot. Before taking your dog for a walk, check the ground for hotness with one of your hands or bare feet. If you cannot keep your hand or foot on the ground for more than three seconds, it is certainly too hot for an animal. During the hot summer months, consider going on short walks early in the morning or later in the evening when the temperature is more bearable.
“Dogs who are older, overweight, have a thick coat, or have a pushed-in nose, such as bulldogs and pugs, are at increased risk of overheating,” she said. “It’s always a good idea to bring water for both you and your pet.”
Keeping your dog hydrated is essential to good health and is especially important during the summer months. If your dog is inside during the day, make sure it has fresh, cool water that remains in a shaded spot throughout the day, since sun coming through a window can heat a bowl of water. Most dogs will not drink hot water no matter how thirsty they are.
If your dog stays outside during the day, make sure the water bowl is in a place where it cannot be tipped over. Water bowls can be tipped over by dogs trying to make a cool spot to lie down. If possible, give your dog fresh, clean water several times throughout the day.
“Freeze containers of water to put in your pet’s outdoor water bowl,” Nafe said. “This will help ensure your furry friend’s water stays cooler for a longer period of time.”
Also, make sure to provide your pup with a shady area to get out of the sun. A small kiddie pool is a great way to provide a fun cooling-off spot where your dog can play.
“Despite all your precautions, your dog may still show signs of heat stress or heat stroke. Signs of heat stroke include heavy panting that does not resolve as the pet rests, increasing distress, a tongue color that is dark red to almost purple, weakness or collapse, hyper-salivation, vomiting and labored breathing,” Nafe said. “If you suspect a dog or cat is suffering from heat stroke, move him to a cooler environment immediately and apply cool water to the abdomen, ears and foot pads.”
Do not pour ice water over the whole animal, submerge your pet in a tub of cold water, or cover it in a cold, wet blanket, as these all may result in cooling your animal too quickly and decreasing blood flow to important areas. Once stable, get him to a veterinarian as quickly as possible, even if he seems to be cooling down and his temperature seems normal. Heat can cause internal damage to organs that is not obvious from the outside.
Keeping your dog well-groomed is another way to reduce the risk of heat stress and help keep the animal more comfortable in the summer heat. A natural coat that has been groomed offers protection from sunburn and acts as cooling insulation. Shaving your dog’s coat will take away that protection.
“Remember, your pet can’t tell you in words when something is wrong. As responsible pet owners, it’s your job to protect and provide for your pet,” she said. “If you’re feeling uncomfortably warm, it’s a sure bet your dog is, too.”


Oregon Veterinary Specialty Hospital (OVSH) has been serving the Portland and Beaverton area community since 1979. Drs. Steven F. Skinner (Neurology, Neurosurgery) and Robert T. Franklin (Internal medicine.) We welcome referrals from veterinarians all over the Pacific Northwest. Our goal is to help your pet regain health and live a long and happy life.

Oregon Veterinary Specialty Hospital

Address
9339 SW Beaverton Hillsdale Hwy,
Beaverton, OR 97005.
Phone: 503.292.3001
Fax: 503.292.6808
Email: [email protected]

Reasons Cats Get Sick After a Meal

By MADELEINE BURRY Original Article
Hearing your cat throw up is nothing out of the ordinary for most cat owners. We usually just think that they ate a little too much or too quickly. Although this is often the case, sometimes there can be a more serious reason.
If you’re a cat owner, it’s very likely a familiar occurrence that shortly after feeding your cat, you hear the sounds of regurgitation, and realize your cat has vomited. Why is it so common for cats to throw up after eating, and should you be concerned? Here are five common reasons behind cat vomiting, from the not-so-serious to potentially serious problems that necessitate a visit to the vet.

1. EATING TOO QUICKLY

When you set out wet food, or refill your cat’s dish with dry food, they can get a little too excited to nosh, and eat too quickly. Food eaten too quickly doesn’t get digested well, causing your cat to vomit. Movement or exercise after eating can also spur vomiting. If your cat vomits as a result of speedy eating, try feeding her several small meals throughout the day, rather than one large bowl full of food.

2. HAIRBALLS

Although hairballs are caused by hairs ingested during your cat’s grooming, and not by mealtime food, presence of hairballs can also lead to vomiting after your cat eats.

3. FOOD INTOLERANCE OR FOOD ALLERGY

If your cat is eating something in their food that they they’re allergic to, or even if your cat simply has an intolerance to it, this can lead to vomiting.

4. NEW FOOD

Switching foods could introduce an ingredient that causes an allergic reaction, but it could also simply throw off your cat’s eating routine, leading to vomiting after a meal. To avoid this, always switch to a new food gradually.

5. IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME

In addition to vomiting, irritable bowel syndrome can lead to upset stomachs and diarrhea. If you notice these symptoms, a visit to the vet is recommended to come up with a treatment plan.

MORE SERIOUS CAUSES

More serious problems can also cause cats to vomit. For instance, your cat may have a stomach obstruction as a result of ingesting a non-food item, like a rubber band. Or your cat may have accidentally eaten something poisonous. It’s also possible that your cat has a metabolic disorder, like a kidney-related problem or hyperthyroidism.
So as a pet owner, what should you do if your cat vomits frequently? If the vomit seems clearly tied to your cat scarfing down food at mealtime, you should try feeding your cat several small meals, as opposed to one or two large ones, and providing food at the same time each day. If your cat is a serious groomer then a specially formulated “hairball food” or supplement can help.
If vomiting persists on a weekly basis or more frequently, then there might be a more serious cause and a visit to the vet is recommended.


Oregon Veterinary Specialty Hospital (OVSH) has been serving the Portland and Beaverton area community since 1979. Beaverton Veterinary Specialist Dr. Robert T. Franklin (Internal medicine) welcomes referrals from veterinarians all over the Pacific Northwest. Our goal is to help your pet regain health and live a long and happy life.

Oregon Veterinary Specialty Hospital

Address
9339 SW Beaverton Hillsdale Hwy,
Beaverton, OR 97005.
Phone: 503.292.3001
Fax: 503.292.6808
Email: [email protected]